Divided we fall in the Comox Valley

Dear editor,

When I moved in 1982 to the Valley it was in the midst of public meetings, discussions, assessments of amalgamation.

Dear editor,

When I moved in 1982 to the Valley it was in the midst of public meetings, discussions, assessments of whether Courtenay and Comox should be amalgamated.

Apparently this was not the first time this issue was in the public forum.

Over the past 30 years, amalgamation has come up a few times, and each time the pros and cons discussed, among them that amalgamating two town halls, staffs, planning departments, fire departments, and many other bureaucracies and works, would have meant savings to taxpayers, and our Valley as a joined force would have more political clout and impact as a unified community.

Each time, the decision was made to leave things as they were — the two communities it was said, although a couple of minutes apart, have separate identities, different demographics, community goals, and political focus.

And, most importantly it always seemed, which mayor would sacrifice their throne?

Well, here we are, now split into two separate electoral areas. Our two communities and the municipal councils, organizations, charities, and services within them now have a political nightmare ahead of them.

Not to mention what this is so going to cost us, and not just financial. Probably a lot more than amalgamation would have, I’ll bet.

Over the years many groups, politicians, and individuals have worked so hard to make us one strong, collaborative, united Valley in much of what we do here.

I truly thought that splitting us in two was such a ludicrous idea, that surely Ottawa would come to its senses. Wrong again.

L. McLean,

Courtenay