EDITORIAL: Crosswalks and crosses

As seen on our letters page, and with some of our online responses to the “Pride” crosswalk approved by the City of Courtenay recently, some of our readers are suggesting the city also acknowledge other communities.

While there’s nothing wrong with acknowledging any faction of our society, the point is being missed as to why it is important to acknowledge the LGBTQ community.

Or is it?

Some would say the point isn’t being missed, but rather, ignored.

A letter in this week’s Record suggests there should be crosses put at each end of the crosswalk, in the spirit of inclusiveness, and to recognize those being persecuted around the world for their Christian belief.

While that might be so in other areas, the persecution of Christians certainly isn’t so in this country, much less in the Comox Valley.

One needs only to count the number of churches in this community, this province and this country to recognize the acceptance of Christianity in Canada.

Conversely, the LGBTQ community feels compelled to hide behind closed doors, for fear of physical or mental anguish. The proof is well documented, by words and by actions. We have had promises posted by people on our Facebook page of their plans to vandalize the rainbow crosswalk the moment the paint dries.

It took all of two hours for the first skid marks to appear on the Campbell River rainbow crosswalk.

The last report we received of a church being vandalized in the Comox Valley was in January of 2010.

While we don’t necessarily understand the need to add crosses at this particular crosswalk, we respect that the author is of a differing opinion.

That said, we wonder why the suggestion of crosses at crosswalks had, to our knowledge, never been entertained prior to the initiative put forth by the LGBTQ community.

The irony of a Christian requesting inclusion into an LGBTQ activity is that the LGBTQ community is one of the most inclusive communities we know. Its members welcome anyone into their community, regardless of faith, colour or sexual identity.

Sadly, we also know, through history, experience, and even certain verses in the Bible itself, in the Christian community, that amiability would not necessarily be reciprocated.

–Terry Farrell

Just Posted

Valley secondary school salad bar launches at Isfeld

Although there isn’t a formal cafeteria in the school, students at Mark… Continue reading

Comox considers plastic bag ban

Council has taken one step closer to banning single-use plastic bags and straws within the town.

Risk of ‘deadly avalanches’ leads to warning for B.C.’s south coast

Weak layer of snow on Vancouver Island, Lower Mainland could trigger an avalanche

Comox Valley Cycling Coalition AGM upcoming

The Comox Valley Cycling Coalition will have a couple of special guest… Continue reading

Update: Early morning shooting in Courtenay

Reporter at taped-off scene outside apartment complex

NIC hosts high school students

North Island College hosted a High School Open House Thursday at the… Continue reading

Galchenyuk scores in OT as Coyotes edge Canucks 3-2

Vancouver manages single point as NHL playoff chase continues

B.C. legislature moving suspended staff controversy to outside review

Whale watching, Seattle Mariners trips billed as emergency preparedness, Speaker Darryl Plecas says

More people signing up for compulsory vaccines

Maple Ridge mom says public tired of hearing about measles

NIC Comox Valley to add student housing

168 units expected to open in 2022

UPDATE: Man charged in stabbing of woman, off-duty cop outside B.C. elementary school

Manoj George, 49, is facing two counts of aggravated assault and two counts of assault with a weapon after the incident on Wednesday, Feb. 20.

Federal fisheries minister calls for precautionary approach to fish farming

Government still reviewing Federal Court’s decision on PRV – Wilkinson

Why do zebras have stripes? Perhaps to dazzle away flies

Researchers from University of Bristol look into why zebras have stripes

Poll: More voters believe Canada doing worse under Trudeau government

22 per cent believed the country is doing better and 27 per cent said things are the same

Most Read