EDITORIAL: Crosswalks and crosses

As seen on our letters page, and with some of our online responses to the “Pride” crosswalk approved by the City of Courtenay recently, some of our readers are suggesting the city also acknowledge other communities.

While there’s nothing wrong with acknowledging any faction of our society, the point is being missed as to why it is important to acknowledge the LGBTQ community.

Or is it?

Some would say the point isn’t being missed, but rather, ignored.

A letter in this week’s Record suggests there should be crosses put at each end of the crosswalk, in the spirit of inclusiveness, and to recognize those being persecuted around the world for their Christian belief.

While that might be so in other areas, the persecution of Christians certainly isn’t so in this country, much less in the Comox Valley.

One needs only to count the number of churches in this community, this province and this country to recognize the acceptance of Christianity in Canada.

Conversely, the LGBTQ community feels compelled to hide behind closed doors, for fear of physical or mental anguish. The proof is well documented, by words and by actions. We have had promises posted by people on our Facebook page of their plans to vandalize the rainbow crosswalk the moment the paint dries.

It took all of two hours for the first skid marks to appear on the Campbell River rainbow crosswalk.

The last report we received of a church being vandalized in the Comox Valley was in January of 2010.

While we don’t necessarily understand the need to add crosses at this particular crosswalk, we respect that the author is of a differing opinion.

That said, we wonder why the suggestion of crosses at crosswalks had, to our knowledge, never been entertained prior to the initiative put forth by the LGBTQ community.

The irony of a Christian requesting inclusion into an LGBTQ activity is that the LGBTQ community is one of the most inclusive communities we know. Its members welcome anyone into their community, regardless of faith, colour or sexual identity.

Sadly, we also know, through history, experience, and even certain verses in the Bible itself, in the Christian community, that amiability would not necessarily be reciprocated.

–Terry Farrell

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