EDITORIAL: Easing of restrictions brings cautious optimism

COVID-19 directives will not be lifted all at once

Provincial officials here in British Columbia have begun launching the next plans for managing the COVID-19 pandemic.

Since the middle of March, we have been under some noticeable restrictions in order to slow the spread of this pandemic.

Gatherings of more than 50 people are prohibited, and physical distancing of two metres between people is required.

Numerous businesses have had to close their doors entirely or adapt to these restrictions.

For the rest of us, the changes have kept us from getting together with friends and relatives, attending concerts and events, or participating in team sports.

It has not been in vain.

For the most part, people have followed the directives and by doing so, have slowed the spread of the virus. The efforts we have made has meant the pandemic here in British Columbia has not affected us as hard as in other parts of the world.

The time has come to ease up on the restrictions.

The Comox Valley emergency operations centre has announced the reopening of numerous outdoor recreation facilities throughout the community (see page 31).

And while that news comes with general applause, it is important to remember that this is a process, and the reopening of our community will happen gradually. The changes will happen in phases.

Bonnie Henry, B.C.’s public health officer, has said large gatherings and festivals will not be happening this year.

Even weddings and funerals will be affected. Henry has said organizers will need to look for other ways to hold these events, restricting the number of people who attend in person.

None of this has been easy, and some of the limitations will remain in place for some time to come.

But this won’t last forever.

The restrictions will continue to be loosened. They will come to an end.

Eventually, COVID-19 will be a footnote in our history.

For now, however, it is our present reality.

And during this time it is important to continue to follow the directives to slow the spread of this pandemic.

— Black Press

Editorials

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

North Island College alum goes from refugee to full scholarship winner

Submitted by NIC North Island College alumnus Jack Basha is preparing to… Continue reading

Independent school to open in the Comox Valley

A new school is opening in the Comox Valley. Local educators and… Continue reading

Nanwakolas Council makes donation to North Island College to support First Nation students

The money was raised at the 2019 Nanwakolas golf tournament.

North Island College launches virtual orientation

New and returning North Island College students are being welcomed to the… Continue reading

Courtenay-Alberni MP requests expanded application period for fish harvester benefits

Courtenay-Alberni MP Gord Johns is asking the federal government to offer a… Continue reading

B.C. doctors, dentists call on province for mandatory mask rule

Open letter says masks should be worn in indoor public spaces, public transportation or in crowds

Dwindling B.C. bamboo supply leaves Calgary Zoo biologists worried about pandas

Zoo has been trying to send pandas back to China since May

Facebook launches its new TikTok clone, Instagram Reels

Facebook has a long tradition of cloning competitive services

B.C. Appeal Court prevents Victoria woman from using the term ‘death midwife’ in her job

Pashta MaryMoon claimed she had been providing “death-care services” for more than 40 years

‘We all have anxieties’: B.C.’s top doctor addresses return-to-school fears amid COVID-19

Dr. Bonnie Henry promises school restart plan safe for B.C. kids

B.C. fish harvesters receive long-awaited details on pandemic benefits

Applications to the $470-million federal assistance programs will open Aug. 24

B.C. fish harvesters receive long-awaited details on pandemic benefits

Applications to the $470-million federal assistance programs will open Aug. 24

Most Read