Editorial: Foot passenger ferry great idea for Mid-Island

An announcement that the Conservative party pledged on Thursday to provide the “required financial support” to help the Island Ferries group establish a foot-passenger ferry service between Nanaimo and Vancouver can only be seen as good news.

Such a service remains an extremely important transportation link that would propel Nanaimo, and the entire mid-Island region, forward on a variety of levels.

John Duncan, the longtime MP and current candidate for Courtenay-Alberni, was correct when he said the service would be a “game-changer” for the Island.

For commuters, the ability to shuttle back and forth between downtowns in a more timely fashion would be a boon.

If a service sustains a long-term level of success, it will have a huge impact on Nanaimo.

It would make the city a viable option for workers in downtown Vancouver to raise their families in a quieter community, with housing prices being significantly more affordable.

Since one of the best ways to further revitalize downtown Nanaimo would be to have people living there, you have to figure development in the area would be spurred on if a host of new folks wanted to make it their home.

Many people have been behind the idea for years.

“I have lost count of the letters I wrote and phone calls I made,” said Nanaimo-Ladysmith Conservative candidate Mark MacDonald, whose support for the project dates back many years.

“The foot passenger ferry is the missing link in the Central Island’s transportation infrastructure.”

The project will boost tourism.

Day trips in either direction become instantly more affordable.

It should spur on new business in Nanaimo and area.

Basically, everyone’s a fan.

So far, Island Ferries has done everything right. Provided all their ducks are in a row, their own financing is in place and the vessels prove reliable, it could indeed be a “game-changer.”

And something we can all get behind.

 

 

Black Press

 

Just Posted

VIDEO: Comox Valley Stage 4 water restrictions lifted

Video explains planning and execution of repair

International paddle film festival coming to the Comox Valley

Naviguide Insurance & Employee Benefits along with Vanguard Intellectual are proud to… Continue reading

Courtenay Fish and Game members pitch in on annual spring cleaning effort

By Gail Eggiman Special to The Record Courtenay and District Fish and… Continue reading

People’s Party of Canada plan to have a candidate in the North Island-Powell River riding

Elections Canada formally recognized the North Island—Powell River PPC Association

North Island College showcases web programming and design talent

North Island College’s Interactive Media Grad Show will feature the best work… Continue reading

What’s age got to do with it? B.C. couple with 45-year gap talks happy marriage

An Armstrong couple that has 45-year age gap began turning heads after being featured on show Extreme Love.

Easter bombings a response to New Zealand attacks, says Sri Lanka minister

The Islamic State group asserted it was responsible for the nine bombings

PHOTOS: New commemorative loonie marks progress’ for LGBTQ2 people

But advocates say it mistakenly suggests equality has been achieved largely as a result of government actions

Comox Valley Strikers U18 girls win provincial volleyball championship

The Comox Valley Strikers U18 girls are provincial champions. The Strikers won… Continue reading

Man charged in fatal Salmon Arm church shooting to appear in court

Matrix Savage Gathergood charged with first degree murder, aggravated assault

RCMP looking to retrace steps of woman found dead on Kelowna beach

Caitlin Midori Bradley, a 29-year-old dancer at a Kelowna bar, was originally from Surrey

Busy Tuesday for BC Ferries passengers

First sailings to and from Swartz Bay sold out

B.C. VIEWS: NDP’s lawyer show is turning into a horror movie

Court actions pile up over pipelines, car insurance, care aides

United Way opens grants to help charities tackle social issues

Charities north of the Malahat can apply for grants $2,000 to $20,000

Most Read