EDITORIAL: Is Yap really listening?

Despite a clear message from public, B.C. Liberals still don't want people to enjoy convenience when it comes to liquor purchases

Why is it that B.C., regardless of what party is in power, seems to love social engineering.

With a three-month consultation period ending, Richmond-Steveston MLA John Yap said Tuesday about 80 per cent of respondents want the extra convenience that is routine in U.S. grocery stores — people in B.C. clearly want to be able to buy their beer, wine and liquor in the same place they buy their groceries, something that’s commonplace in many jurisdictions in North America.

Yap, according to reports from Black Press, says he has heard that message loud and clear. Considering the spin he’s now putting on the results, we suggest he hasn’t heard the message loudly or clearly.

Yap is proposing a “store within a store” model with separate staff for alcohol purchases.

It’s like the government — the supposed free enterprise, less government, less-red-tape B.C. Liberals for goodness sake — believes it needs to protect us from ourselves. Despite a clear message to the contrary, the B.C. Liberals want to hold on to some control and make things more difficult for consumers and businesses alike.

Alcohol use has its inherent dangers. It can destroy families. But there is no evidence to suggest alcohol-related tragedies are more prevalent in jurisdictions that allow a more logical, consumer-friendly way to purchase a bottle of wine or a case of beer.

If grocery-store owners don’t want the hassle, or don’t see profit large enough to go along with any aggravation caused by liquor sales, that’s fair — they should have the choice to sell what they please in their places of business. But we are not hearing that, either.

Perhaps Yap believes this is such a big shift for the great unwashed that it has to be introduced in phases. Again, that’s social engineering and we take offence to being parented by politicians.

We suspect it’s all about money. Or relationships with unions. Perhaps the B.C. Liberals believe the model Yap suggests will allow them to hold on to more of the money they get from liquor sales. Or perhaps they don’t want to engage in the fight that’s surely to emerge if every government-owned and union-staffed liquor store is closed.

If that is the case, then say it. Loudly and clearly, would be good. We can take the truth. It’s the mamby-pamby, social engineering, government-knows-best stance we resent.

— Editorial by John Harding

Just Posted

Comox Valley RCMP looking for suspicious man in Courtenay

Man was frantically waving at vehicles

Comox Valley golfers prepare for another 55+ Games

Competition, camaraderie name of the game

Comox Valley firefighters assist with wildfire effort

Four Courtenay firefighters are in Fort St. James helping with the fight… Continue reading

Woman rescued from Stotan Falls calling for safety measures

3L Developments did not comment on immediate plans to add safety precautions

B.C. declares state of emergency as more than 560 wildfires rage

This is only the fourth state of emergency ever issued during a fire season

Glacier View residents take a ride on the river

Ground Search and Rescue guides floaters on Puntledge

Two hurt in car wreck on old Island Highway

Honda and Volkswagen crash at 10 p.m. Friday at highway intersection in Nanaimo

Authorities mull evacuation order for Zeballos

Smoke billowed from the steep hillsides of Zeballos on Friday evening, as… Continue reading

Safeway union urges prejection of mediator recommendations

Says mediator asks for too many concessions

Fire chases B.C. crews out of their own camp

Crews in Burns Lake had to leave after a wildfire reportedly overtook their sleeping quarters

To address peacock problem, B.C. city moves ahead on trapping plan

Surrey’s new bylaw focuses on ensuring people no longer feed the birds, ahead of relocation

Hospitals to see ‘delays’ in care after losing Saudi students, health group says

About 1,000 Saudi residents called back to kingdom after suspending diplomatic relations with Canada

Bernier diatribe against ‘extreme multiculturalism’ boosts Liberal coffers

Party spokesperson Braeden Caley says online donations doubled, social media engagement quadrupled

‘Disjointed’ system hinders British Columbia First Nations in wildfire fight

More than 550 wildfires were burning in B.C. and crews were bracing for wind and dry lightning

Most Read