Editorial: Patience a virtue behind the wheel

With the crashes seen lately on the region’s highways and arterial roads, and even the fender benders on the commute and in parking lots, it’s clear something is happening.

We wonder if drivers’ attention spans are diminished this time of year or if some more scientific reason exists for what seems to be an increased number of traffic incidents.

For certain, at this time of year many of us are anxious to get to our destinations, whether it be work or shopping, heading out for holidays or travelling to the homes of friends or relatives for an evening or weekend barbecue or gathering.

Regardless of the journey’s end, it’s worth taking a little extra time to plan ahead for the travel, whether it be the route you’re taking, the time you depart or a combination of the two. Both can pose challenges with more people on the roads, and create unnecessary stress that often leads to aggressive and unsafe driving actions.

We’ve all seen people passing when it’s unsafe, driving at overly high speeds or tailgating, to name a few indiscretions. If no crash or mishap occurs as a result of such behaviours, the people victimized by such aggressive driving can count themselves lucky. But that’s not always the case.

As the popular bumper sticker states, “Failure to plan on your part does not dictate an emergency on my part.” How true. Demonstrating patience is not necessarily taught by driving schools or listed in any handbook, but it’s a critically important aspect of defensive driving.

Preventing all examples of dangerous driving on the highway or lower-speed roads is impossible, so we have to ensure we’re prepared for the possibility of encountering bad drivers.

Keep an eye on the road ahead, including the traffic directly in front of you, and scan side to side, in case you’re going to miss the traffic light. Anticipating what other drivers are going to do, or could do, will go a long ways toward ensuring the safety of yourself and any passengers you might have in the vehicle.

At the very least, remember to breathe when behind the wheel. You’ll get there eventually, even without driving like a knucklehead. – Black Press

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Crown Isle in Courtenay home to one of lottery’s prize homes

Extras with local BC Children’s Hospital prize include nearby townhouse, vehicles and cash

Information session upcoming in Courtenay for potential Habitat for Humanity homeowners

One year ago, Kiley and her husband attended a homeownership information session… Continue reading

Hitched Wedding and Event Affair is a busy affair

This year Hitched is happening at the Comox Community Centre.

Darcy Sharpe wins first place in men’s snowboard slopestyle at Winter X Games

The two-time Olympic slopestyle bronze medallist is among 31 Canadians competing

VIDEO: Canada’s first presumptive case of coronavirus officially confirmed

Both patient and wife arrived on a China Southern Airlines flight after having been to Wuhan

First-place Canucks beat Blues 3-1 for ninth straight home win

Miller nets pair as Vancouver defeats Cup champs

Swapping grape varieties can help winemakers adapt to climate change: UBC study

Report says 56% of wine-grape-growing regions would be lost if global climate warms by 2 C

Alberta premier wants feds to approve Teck mine for benefit of First Nations

Kenney: ‘Surely [reconciliation] means saying yes to economic development for First Nations people’

Police search for man who went missing from Vernon hotel

Jay Rosenberger, 38, was last seen Friday

Filming for Resident Alien begins in Ladysmith

Aliens and excitement take over the streets of Ladysmith during new TV series

Women assaulted in pair of weekend attacks in Port Alberni

RCMP say no reason to suspect attacks are related, but suspects still at large

NDP suggests easing secondary housing rules for B.C. farmland

Lana Popham proposes guest homes not just for relatives

Most Read