EDITORIAL: Refuse to live in fear

Fear spreads quickly, but so does solidarity

We weren’t standing in the line of fire. We weren’t hit by shards of shrapnel. We didn’t smell the acrid smoke or feel the percussive thrust, but we were all hurt deeply by the horrific explosions at the Boston Marathon on Monday.

It’s been an emotional, fear-filled week. The aftermath of the bombings had most of us glued to the news, hoping to learn why.

The answer to that may never come, or if it does, it may not make sense. It’s difficult to make sense of the senseless.

Terrorist acts like these bombings are meant to hurt us all. Some of us physically, brutally, even more of us at an emotional level.

Fear is a weapon easily wielded, a disease that too quickly spreads.

Whether or not you’re a runner, this week you likely felt that fear, that vulnerability. You likely shed tears for people you’ve never met. Perhaps you said a prayer or hugged your loved ones a little closer.

Fred Rogers has been often quoted this week. The U.S. children’s TV host, Mister Rogers said: “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’”

In the days after the bombings, many stories have focused on the survivors and those who came to their rescue. Selfless bystanders who rendered aid, those who staunched the flow of blood with bare hands, those who carried the wounded to safety.

Here at home, far from the scene of the carnage, we showed our support, our solidarity with those personally affected by the blasts.

As the shock and anger began to subside, our community came together to remember those affected by the Boston bombings, runners wore ribbons, held vigils and made vows to support those affected.

In the days ahead we may continue to feel the emotional impact of the blasts, but we must remember, we can’t run from fear, rather we should run despite it.

 

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