EDITORIAL Two sides to blame

Much work needs to be done to repair broken education system bargaining

Given the dispute between the B.C. Teachers Federation and the employer, which for all intents and purposes is the provincial government, has dragged on for months, it seems quite likely there will be no classes into the foreseeable future.

This is completely unacceptable. There is no shortage of blame to go around, but it is the two primary parties in the dispute who have brought public school students and their parents to this sad state of affairs.

At one time, the B.C. Liberal government banned strikes by teachers, saying that using students as pawns in a labour dispute was unacceptable. That was a move that met with considerable public support. However, teachers disregarded the ban and went on strike in 2005, and actually gained considerable public sympathy, partly due to the fact that the B.C. Liberals had torn up part of their existing contract, and partly due to the fact that their emphasis was on class size and composition.

That’s the emphasis again, and this time the strike is perfectly legal. It appears that the first part of September, and maybe the whole month, will be an education loss for students.

The public has absolutely no control over the BCTF, and any discipline to be handed out there must be done by BCTF members, if enough of them disagree with the union executive’s actions in continuing this strike. The public does have at least a measure of control over the provincial government. The ability to recall MLAs exists, although it is very difficult to do. If the government doesn’t start showing a lot more concern for students’ education, and actually  move heaven and Earth to get classrooms open, it would be appropriate for parents in all ridings held by Liberal MLAs to look into starting recall campaigns.

The fact is, neither side is taking students’ education all that seriously. They are treating this as a political fight — something both the BCTF and B.C. Liberals excel at.

The education system exists so students can have a brighter future as adults. It’s high time they were back in class.

-Black Press

 

Just Posted

Little Qualicum Cheeseworks cheese linked to 5 E. coli cases in B.C.

People are asked to throw out or return ‘Qualicum Spice’ cheese

Jim’s Clothes Closet celebrates 50th anniversary

Store began in Port Alberni, expanded on Vancouver Island and beyond

BC Ferries passengers wait to leave Vancouver Island after Remembrance Day

Traffic aboard BC Ferries slows after Remembrance Day long weekend

Recent CVGSAR rescues see varying degrees of success

Teams searched for a dog swept downstream and helped an 80-year-old hiker

Comox Valley Nature invites the public to learn about nature photography

Comox Valley Nature is hosting a public lecture on photography. Join Terry… Continue reading

VIDEO: Amazon to split second HQ between New York, Virginia

Official decision expected later Tuesday to end competition between North American cities to win bid and its promise of 50,000 jobs

Student arrested at Vancouver Island elementary school

Pupils never in danger, incident unrelated to the school

Comox Valley Nature invites the public to learn about nature photography

Comox Valley Nature is hosting a public lecture on photography. Join Terry… Continue reading

Contest: Win a movie pass for two

It’s that time again - free movie passes! The Record is giving… Continue reading

Vancouver Island remembers

Important stories shared as Islanders salute those who made the greatest sacrifice

Stink at B.C. school prompts complaints of headaches, nausea

Smell at Abbotsford school comes from unauthorized composting operation

Fear of constitutional crisis escalates in U.S.; Canadians can relate

Some say President Donald Trump is leading the U.S. towards a crisis

B.C.-based pot producer Tilray reports revenue surge, net loss

Company remains excited about ‘robust’ cannabis industry

Canada stands pat on Saudi arms sales, even after hearing Khashoggi tape

Khashoggi’s death at Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul further strained Riyadh’s already difficult relationship with Ottawa

Most Read