Faith negates the need for legalized euthanasia

Dear Editor:

Québec’s recent legalization of euthanasia gives us an opportunity to think about what life and death mean for us.

The Québec legislators assume that death is life’s natural end.

In this view, men and women are born, pass through a period of existence (either pleasant or miserable, depending on seemingly arbitrary factors) and expire, leaving behind little more than memories. Happiness is found in co-operating with one another and the environment for the best possible life experience.

Sometimes that experience is bad. Euthanasia, with or without limitations, is proposed to help people who, after trying all alternatives, have lost hope. It offers freedom from pain, suffering and trouble. It provides a quiet and easy departure into a final rest.

If life really were so meaningless, then those who are unable to enjoy it might be right to welcome an escape. But Québec’s government and other euthanasia advocates are missing reality. In spite of appearances, humans are intended not for death but for life.

Yes, we all die sooner or later, but death is not the purpose of the human race.

The Bible tells us that God created a living world into which death came only as a result of sin.

The gospel is the story of how the now-dying world can be restored to life through Jesus Christ.

All who believe in Him will experience the eternal life obtained by His death and resurrection. Men and women may live with God for ever.

These spiritual truths provide a new perspective on the euthanasia debate. If the current life is not ultimate, the pain and distress that might drive people to wish for death can instead be accepted– even enjoyed – as a good and needful part of anticipating the better life.

The one who knows the truth about life does not fear death, but neither does he seek it; he can better prepare for eternal life by living the human life at its fullest.

In other words, Christianity eliminates any need for euthanasia. Instead of death, Christians look forward to life.

Brendon Johnson,

Courtenay

 

Just Posted

Vancouver Island pharmacist suspended for giving drugs with human placenta

RCMP had samples of the seized substances tested by Health Canada

Motor vehicle incident on Mount Washington road involving a motorcycle

Emergency personnel were called out to the scene of a motor vehicle… Continue reading

Bylaw rescinded after vacation rental owners express concerns

Concerns included a lack of consultation

Get ready for a week of sunshine across Vancouver Island

Environment Canada is forecasting temperatures in the high teens all this week

B.C. students send books to displaced students of Hornby Island school fire

Maple Ridge elementary school teacher says students learned about acts of kindness

Video: Flyers new mascot ‘Gritty’ a bearded, googly-eyed terror

The Philadelphia Flyers unveiled their new mascot Monday, and as one would expect of the team that gave us the “Broad Street Bullies,” he’s far from cuddly.

Vancouver Island designated as foreign trade zone

Designation simplifies importing and exporting and provides duty relief

Edmonton cannabis company revenues more than triples to $19.1 million

Aurora Cannabis revenues more than triple in fourth quarter

Seattle one step closer to NHL after arena plan approved

Seattle City Council unanimously approved plans for a privately funded $700 million renovation of KeyArena

Harvest Moon to light up B.C. skies with an ‘autumn hue’

It’s the first moon after the autumn equinox

Hockey league gets $1.4M for assistance program after Humboldt Broncos crash

Program will help players, families, coaches and volunteers after the shock of the deadly crash

Canada has removed six out of 900 asylum seekers already facing U.S. deportation

Ottawa had said the ‘overwhelming majority’ had been removed

Appeal pipeline decision but consult Indigenous communities, Scheer says

The federal appeals court halted the Trans Mountain expansion last month

Most Read