Government is failing us

Deal with China does nothing to protect our natural resources

Dear editor,

 

I have read some of the concerns that people have with the FIPA agreement and the rebuttal (explanation) of MP John Duncan.

I just want to start with the following; I understand in these tough economic times and that we (Canadians) need to look to the future to ensure our economy continues to flourish and not languish, but to what cost? China has proven that they cannot be trusted and one such example is when they conducted a cyber attack on Canada’s computer system: “Assaults that crippled computer systems at the Finance Department and Treasury Board in January 2011 have been linked to efforts – possibly originating in China – to gather data on the potential takeover of a Canadian potash company.” Reference from The Canadian Press, published: Wednesday, Oct.  24, 2012. There is no definitive proof that it was China, but I bet they were one of the bidders.

John Duncan stated in his article “this treaty is designed to protect Canada” but I question his motivation. China is a bull in a China shop, and the China shop is the environment and livelihoods of all Canadians. Why is it that Canada doesn’t want to completely protect our natural recourses? Do we not need them? Are our natural resources in such abundance that we can just give them away to the highest bidder?

We (Canada) should be in complete control of all our natural resources, but we aren’t. Why you ask? It’s simple, MONEY. The one thing that corrupts our judgment and people in control of our nation and its lands.

John Duncan stated that he doesn’t want  China to be discriminated against with arbitrary practices. Well, that is exactly what the Harper Government is doing to us, by arbitrarily enacting such a flawed agreement with out public input and consultation. We (all Canadians) are being sold down the river with agreements such as this without even any say.

John Duncan also throws out such terms as “transparent” and “the scrutiny of the house of Commons.” When have you ever seen any concerns raised by the opposition being heeded by the Majority Harper Government, rather it’s just arbitrarily pushed through and enacted?

I point to the way the Harper Government has treated its own employees,  the Canadian Government workers. The government has enacted bills (laws) to take away benefits and raises, with no negotiations or consultation. Basically, it just forced  the changes down their throats, like some scene out of a 1920’s movie about labour disputes.

Have we as a country slipped so far that we either can’t be bothered with what’s happening to us, or has the government failed to protect us, our lands and our interest?

I can ensure you, China is in firm control of whatever natural resources they have in their country. Why don’t we?

Debbie McFadden

Courtenay

 

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