HAVE YOUR SAY: Fairness needed for users of Comox Valley’s municipal water supply

There has been much controversy about water meters and rates.

There has been much controversy about water meters and rates. However, during stage 3 emergencies, meters would be the only fair way to manage and allocate a reduced water supply to all Comox Valley customers. Making exceptions for car washes, municipalities, strata properties and golf courses sends the wrong message on conserving water for firefighting purposes. If this is really an emergency, restrictions need to apply to all users. A better way to allocate water during stage 3, would be to allocate one cubic metre per day to every customer — enough for multi-family use, car washing, or keeping the  lawn and garden healthy. Customers would have to decide on priorities. Those using more that one cubic metre per day would receive a large surcharge on their water bill, every day on the stage 3 restriction. The surcharge would apply to all customers. Another good reason to have universal water metering and the same rate structures for all Comox Valley water customers.

Heartfelt thank yous to all the RNs, LPNs, care aides, physiotherapists, kitchen and laundry staff, recreational staff, maintenance staff and everyone at the Cumberland Lodge. Our sincere gratitude and appreciation for looking after Jeff so well, for being so kind, caring and supportive. We are truly touched by your extraordinary compassion.

Courtenay Future Shop staff have a goal of Connecting Youth with Technology and they have the know-how and the resources to make it happen. Future Shop staff selected the autism program at the Comox Valley Child Development Association and asked for a wishlist. In two minutes flat, autism program manager April Statz and her enthusiastic team of interventionists came up with a list of hardware and software that they knew the kids would love and would be terrific learning tools. Courtenay Future Shop staff narrowed down the list and delivered an impressive array of stuff including a flat screen TV with wall mount, DVD player, and a mini Wi-Fi player with remote control. The goods were installed and put into action immediately and the participants in the autism program are learning and having fun, a perfect combination! The Comox Valley Child Development Association (CVCDA) provides services for children with developmental delays and disabilities including physical, cognitive, communication, social/emotional and behavioural needs. Family-centred services include assessments, individualized supports and intervention. For more information, visit the CVCDA website at www.cvcda.ca or call 250-338-4288.

Half of Canadians have never talked to family and friends about what they would want if they were ill and could not speak for themselves. But all of us will die. So, what’s the use of avoiding the topic? It’s time for us to take our heads out of the sand and talk about advance care planning. You are cordially invited to learn more about advance care planning at an introductory workshop on Monday, Sept. 23 at 7 p.m. hosted by Berwick Comox Valley, 1700 Comox Avenue. Regardless of our age, we can all provide a wonderful gift to our loved ones by completing an advance care plan. What is advance care planning? Advance care planning is a process of reflection and communication, a time for you to reflect on your values and wishes, and to let others know your future health and personal care preferences in the event that you become incapable of consenting to or refusing treatment or other care. Having an advance care plan can give us comfort and assurance that our end-of-life wishes will be honoured. It means having conversations with family and friends and designating a representative — the person you want to speak for you if you cannot. It may also include writing down your wishes, and may involve talking with your doctor, financial and legal professionals. You may never need your advance care plan — but if you do, you’ll be glad that it’s there and that you have had these conversations, to make sure that your voice is heard when you cannot speak for yourself. To RSVP for the workshop, please call 250-339-1690. For more information and valuable resources about advance care planning, visit www.advancecareplaningcv.ca or call the Comox Valley Hospice Society at 250-339-5533.

Canada owes a tremendous debt to its many refugees. Dr. Vladimir Krajina was a committed believer in democracy and eminent botanist who found refuge in 1949 in UBC’s School of Forestry, when, as the secretary-general of the democratic government he fled the communist takeover of his country of origin. Professionally, as an eminent Canadian botanist,  Krajina was the first to classify and map our ecosystems.  As a professor of botany he researched the impacts and economics of forest practices and opposed the practice of clear-cutting  and slash burning. His work was instrumental in redefining B.C.’s forest practices. However, his single greatest contribution to his new country was the development of legislation to save pristine and botanically important areas of British Columbia. He is “the father of the Ecological Reserve Program,” which is replicated throughout Canada. Jan Drabek, author of the recent book Vladimir Krajina:World War II Hero and Ecology Pioneer, will present a one-hour lecture on Krajina’s life and work at the monthly meeting of Comox Valley Nature.  Jan Drabek is a the author of 18 books of fiction and non-fiction in English and Czech. He is former president of the Federation of BC Writers and member of the Writer’s Union of Canada. The meeting  and illustrated lecture will take place on Sunday, Sept. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Florence Filberg Centre (411 Anderton Avenue). Admission is free to members, $3 to non-members.) For those unable to come to the CVN lecture, Jan Drabek will be available for a book signing Sept. 14 at 2 p.m. at The Laughing Oyster. Comox Valley Nature is a non-profit society affiliated to BC Nature that fulfills its educational mandate by hosting monthly lectures, organizing free weekly guided hikes and undertaking a variety of environmental projects. Aside from its main activity as a non-profit, Comox Valley Nature also supports specialized groups (birding, botany, Garry oak restoration, wetland restoration, photography and Young Naturalists Club), which have separate monthly activities. Founded in 1966, it is one of the oldest environmental societies on the North Island. Anyone interested in participating in CVNS activities can also visit the website at  http://comoxvalleynaturalist.bc.ca or phone Loys Maingon (CVN president) at 250-331-0143.

Fall is a great time to explore the sub-alpine at Paradise Meadows in Strathcona Park. The programs offered by Strathcona Wilderness Institute at the Strathcona Park Wilderness Centre will continue for several more weeks. The Wilderness Centre is at the Paradise Meadows trailhead adjacent to Mount Washington’s Raven Lodge, and is operated by the Strathcona Wilderness Institute (SWI), a non-profit society. On Saturday, Sept. 14,  join a guided hike to the Cruickshank Canyon lookout. Meet at 8 a.m. at the Wilderness Centre for this nine-hour, 22-km outing with about a 500-metre cumulative elevation gain. This moderately strenuous hike will focus on nature photography. On Sunday, Sept. 15 join a berry hike to identify blueberries, huckleberries, crowberries and more. Meet at 10 a.m. at the Wilderness Centre for this three-hour nature outing. Strathcona Wilderness Institute also provides assistance for school group outings, such as nature guides or information — please contact coordinator@strathconapark.org for more details. For all activities: dress for the weather, wear proper footwear, bring lunch or snacks, plenty of water, bug spray and sun protection. No pets please on SWI guided nature walks & hikes unless noted otherwise. A minimum donation of $5 –10 is appreciated for the programs to help with the Institute’s ongoing activities. All SWI activities start at the Wilderness Centre.  The Centre will be staffed most days in September. For the most up-to-date information, visit www.strathconapark.org.

• • •

Do you have somebody to praise or something you have to get off your chest? Have your say by submitting to editor@comoxvalleyrecord.com. Please focus on people’s ideas rather than speculating about their character. You can also get a written submission to 765 McPhee Ave., Courtenay, B.C. V9N 2Z7 or fax to 250-338-5568. If you wish to talk to the editor, phone Mark Allan at 250-338-7816, 2309.

 

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