Hundreds let down by building permit for gas station on Comox Road

Dear editor,
With the decision by Comox Valley Regional district area directors Bruce Jolliffe, Jim Gillis Edwin Grieve to issue a building permit to Wayne Procter's Gas and Go project on the estuary, you have let down hundreds of people in order to please one person.

Dear editor,

With the decision by Comox Valley Regional district area directors Bruce Jolliffe, Jim Gillis Edwin Grieve to issue a building permit to Wayne Procter’s Gas and Go project on the estuary, you have let down hundreds of people in order to please one person.

It doesn’t make any sense.

Have you not been watching the news lately?

A tanker overturned, spilling nearly 40,000 litres (9,000 gallons) of gasoline into the Goldstream River, causing unspeakable environmental damage. Authorities still don’t know how to contain it, thousands of salmon are dead and the destruction will continue for at least four years.

We are entrusted with one of the most significant estuaries in British Columbia and this is your decision? What is the matter with you?

I feel that you have not been creative in coming up with a solution to this very serious problem.

The project should have been rejected years ago. However, the situation can still be saved. Why not just buy the property?

Mr. Procter at one time stated that he would consider selling it but had not had an offer. Let’s make him an offer. The land could then be turned into a nature preserve.

The people of Cumberland bought a forest. The people of Courtenay/Comox could buy a piece of our estuary.

If the development is worth $1.5 million, that would be only $100 per household — a small price to pay to preserve this very precious part of our community.

M. Machum,

Comox