Kus-kus-sum restoration a win-win

Dear editor,

Re: ‘Huggers’ have no regard for costs and consequences

Mr. Blondel asks: What are the cost benefits of land restoration and conservation? Many may be surprised to learn that ‘tree huggers’ and ‘bean counters’ agree: protecting the environment makes economic sense.

The business case is especially strong for municipalities because “you can’t run a city without nature”. Our environment gives many benefits, like clean air. “Eco-assets” like rivers also reliably deliver municipal services like stormwater management, which is calculated in dollars and saves communities large sums every year.

Kus-kus-sum, the project to restore the Field sawmill site on the Courtenay River at the 17th Street Bridge to natural habitat, will deliver net benefits and improved assets.

While it’s true that eagles and herons don’t pay taxes – they do give back. And residents who enjoy salmon and nature access pay taxes. You don’t see people strolling, paddling or fishing at the salmon “killing wall”. But people will visit Kus-kus-sum and then restaurants, hotels and local businesses. River revitalization adds to the bottom line.

The City of Courtenay is a Kus-kus-sum partner because restoration is also the most innovative, cost-effective way to address financial deficits and liabilities caused by flood risks and “the twin problems of aging infrastructure and ecosystem decline.”

Kus-kus-sum shows leadership for all B.C. and Canada.

As a Comox resident, I’m proud Brooklyn Creek is one of two pilot projects in B.C. using an “Ecological Accounting Process” to quantify benefits of the investments made by our parks and engineering departments, and the Brooklyn Creek Watershed Society. Like Kus-kus-sum, it provides salmon habitat, helps store heavy rainfall, delivers flood mitigation, recreation, education and revenue. It’s a win-win for nature and taxpayers.

Vanessa Scott

Comox

Just Posted

A cappella group Swing Set to play Comox

Quartet to perform live for first time in two years

27th Annual Courtenay and District Fish & Game Outdoor Show coming in June

June is just around the corner and so is the 27th Annual… Continue reading

Vacancies on Courtenay Board of Variance

The City of Courtenay is seeking new members for an important volunteer… Continue reading

No injuries in early morning Comox car fire

Comox firefighters responded to an early morning vehicle fire Monday near the… Continue reading

New version of outdoor art show set to take place in Comox in August

Despite the announcement earlier this year of the cancellation of the Originals… Continue reading

Rescuers finally persuade Eiffel Tower climber to come down

The official said the man was ‘under control and out of danger’ on Monday night

Family of B.C. pilot killed in Honduras trying to ‘piece together’ tragedy

Patrick Forseth has a number of friends in the area and was loved by everyone

Justin Trudeau credits immigration for Canada’s growing tech sector

Trudeau stressed that Canada has become a major source of talent for tech all over the world

Feds launch tourism strategy designed to boost sector 25 per cent by 2025

The fund is supposed to back experiences that show off Canada’s strengths

Mamma Mia! poised to be biggest Chemainus Theatre show ever

Plenty of buzz as Island dinner theatre schedules ABBA-fueled romp

New book from Island author details social history of the E&N railway

Along the E&N tells the story of 32 establishments from Esquimalt to Campbell River.

Should B.C. already be implementing province-wide fire bans?

A petition is calling for B.C. Wildfire Service to issue a ban to reduce risk of human caused wildfires

Growing wildfire prompts evacuation of High Level, Alta.

Chuckegg Creek fire has been burning for several days, but grew substantially Sunday

Top women’s hockey player Natalie Spooner coming to B.C.

Natalie Spooner special guest at annual Grindstone charity weekend in Kelowna

Most Read