LETTER: Many sides to climate change debate

Dear editor,

The ongoing climate change debate is based on many different points of view. Some say it’s Mother Nature’s fault, and there’s nothing we can do. Facts won’t change their beliefs.

Then there’s the group that sides with science. They know the difference between water and ice is just one degree. They fear burning fossil fuels at the present rate could trigger catastrophic floods like the ones that dramatically reshaped the landscape and formed the Scablands in eastern Washington.

For others, putting food on the table trumps the long-term effects of global warming.

And then there’s the group that couldn’t care less. Why worry? I won’t be around when it takes place.

If the climate change champions are wrong, the polices they support won’t be in vain. The planet will be a much better place to live and breathe. If the climate change deniers are wrong, it could prove to be disastrous.

Regardless of your point of view, change is inevitable. Humans have been shaped by the environment ever since our ancestors left Africa in search of shade about 150,000 years ago. Climate change always triggers migration. Vancouver Island is ill-equipped to cope with the tidal wave of environmental refugees heading our way. We will have to rebuild our infrastructure, improve housing and expand health care.

The time to start planning, is now.

Doug Poole

Courtenay

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