Money ‘really opened the throttle’ on selfishness and greed

Dear editor,

When we humans invented farming, we invented the ability to exterminate ourselves through overpopulation.

Dear editor,

When we humans invented farming, we invented the ability to exterminate ourselves through overpopulation.

When we were hunter-gatherers, our population couldn’t outgrow our natural food sources. With farming, overpopulation became possible, and we began to progressively destroy the natural world to make room for crops to support our growing numbers.

When we invented money, we invented an even better reason to destroy the natural world.

Before money was invented, it made no sense for a hunter to kill more than he could use and then hoard it, because large excesses just rotted. Sharing made sense and hoarding didn’t.

Money, however, doesn’t rot, and it really opened the throttle on a few of our less admirable tendencies like selfishness and greed.

In B.C., the results are obvious. Native people lived here for more than 10,000 years without destroying the forests and the salmon.

They didn’t have money, but we brought it. We laid waste to the forests and fish in less than 200 years, and we did it all for money.

Somehow, humans and money together create an almost diabolical mix. We’re currently destroying our planet and ourselves as energetically and speedily as we can, and our biggest concern seems to be the price of gas.

Our entire society is based on money, including our “democratic” governments, (which are being destroyed by the lure of money from large corporations), our education systems, our media, even our food and entertainment.

Money and population growth go well together, because corporations always need more consumers so that they can keep making more money.

Is this good for us?

As humans, we’re the only creatures on earth with the ability to choose. The road we’re on leads to a cliff. Shall we just keep the pedal to the metal?

We can change the direction of our society, but it requires a lot of hard thought and action. Whether we realize it or not, our government is us. It won’t change unless we do.

Karl Stevenson,

Royston

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Valley-filmed mini-series honoured with Canadian Screen Award nomination

Actor Shawn Doyle was nominated in the Best Lead Actor category for Unspeakable

Earthquake drill offers safety lesson for Comox Valley Schools

Exercise at Glacier View includes smoke and pyrotechnics to add element of realism

Updated: Sightseeing airplane crashes in Saanich farm

Two sent to hospital with minor injuries after Cessna 172 crash at 8:55 a.m.

VIDEO: 7 things you need to know about the 2020 B.C. budget

Surplus of $227 million with big spending on infrastructure and capital projects

Public meeting in Courtenay to discuss state of residential care in B.C.

Long term residential care for seniors is an issue that is top… Continue reading

Trees Cannabis director fined $1.5M for selling marijuana

Fine follows provincial crackdown on popular dispensary

World Cup skier from Okanagan dies suddenly at 19

Kuroda, who made his World Cup debut earlier this year, passed away suddenly Monday night.

Coastal GasLink pipeline investor committed to closing deal despite protests

Developer TC Energy Corp. — formerly TransCanada Corp. — is to remain the operator of the $6.6-billion pipeline

New highway proposed between Alberta and B.C.

The route would connect Red Deer to Kamloops

What’s in a name? The story of Revelstoke’s Mt. Begbie

It’s likely the iconic peak had several Indigenous peoples’ names before settlers arrived

Budget 2020: B.C. Liberals blast ‘Netflix tax,’ lack of economic plan

ICBC rates still go up, except in election year, Shirley Bond says

Most Read