OUR VIEW: Resolve not to make resolutions

A new year is about to begin and that has us thinking about renewal — a fresh start and, yes, those dreaded New Year’s Resolutions

A new year is about to begin and that has us thinking about renewal — a fresh start and, yes, those dreaded New Year’s Resolutions.

Some of the best advice we have heard about those things came from Janet Krenz, a registered dietician and community nutritionist with Island Health. In relation to eating habits over the holidays, Krenz said don’t do it — don’t make any resolutions when it comes to food. All they do, she said, is enable people to justify a binge before January 1 and then feel guilty about it afterwards and through the next year.

That advice can be applied throughout the Saanich Peninsula.

Take North Saanich municipal council, for instance. They must have resolved at some point not to continue the bickering during meetings. Why? Because they enjoyed a lot of it at their last meeting before the new year. A bit of a pre-ban bickering binge, if you will. We can only hope they got it out of their system. Realistically, though, residents can expect more of the back-and-forth animosity leading up to next November’s municipal election.

Over in Central Saanich, they have resolved to spend less, thanks to some debt left over from their new fire hall. Residents should hope this resolution holds and no one feels guilty about their spendthrift ways in 2014 and reverses course.

In Sidney, there’s probably no point in resolving to end the Beacon Avenue traffic debate. Why not? Because no matter which direction drivers end up taking along the main drag, someone isn’t going to like it and there will be close calls between cars and pedestrians. It’s inevitable that when people are walking and drivers driving, they will cross paths — often way too closely. The best course of action is to mitigate that conflict as best you can and ensure Sidney’s downtown is welcoming to both groups.

For the rest of the community, resolve not to make a resolution this year, but to live a little happier and more positive and, maybe then, good things will come your way.

 

Just Posted

Valley mother encourages food literacy and mindfulness with placemats

The Mindful Meals placemats help kids to slow down and pay attention to the food they eat.

Victim of downtown Courtenay assault dies from injuries

RCMP confirm file is now a homicide investigation

North Island College’s annual 3-Hour Fiction Contest returns

Two competitions; one for adults, one for U-18 writers

Comox Valley’s drinking water within lead guidelines, say staff

Residents with old homes may still want testing if concerned about pipes, solder

Denman ferry cable to be replaced with plastic cable – for now

The first flattened steel strand cable is expected to be installed late summer 2020

‘I was bawling’: Injured Bronco’s mother stunned by his progress after surgery

Ryan Straschnitzki isn’t expecting a cure but hopes to restore some muscle movement

Comox Fire Rescue donates defibrillator to St. George’s United Church

Comox fighters have donated an automatic external defibrillator (AED) to St. George’s… Continue reading

Most B.C. residents, including those hit by 2018 storms, not prepared for outages: report

Create an emergency kit, BC Hydro says, and report all outages or downed lines

Study finds microplastics in all remote Arctic beluga whales tested

Lead author Rhiannon Moore says she wasn’t expecting to see so many microplastics so far north

Services needed in B.C. for early-onset Alzheimer’s disease patients: doctor, advocates

More patients are being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at an earlier age

Nanaimo man caught with more than 200,000 child porn images to be sentenced

Crown says Aaron Macrae recorded video of children on buses and at his workplace

Vancouver Island hunters may have harvested deer in area known for chronic wasting disease

Conservation officers make urgent request to public for any information

65-million-year-old triceratops fossil arrives in Victoria

Dino Lab Inc. is excavating the fossilized remains of a Triceratops prosus

B.C. widow sues health authority after ‘untreatable’ superbug killed husband

New Public Agency Health report puts Canadian death toll at 5,400 in 2018

Most Read