Railways still make sense elsewhere; why not here?

Dear editor,

It’s a shame that Mr. Peter Whyte considers that the railway is outdated, and that right-of-way should be the preserve of those fortunate enough to live beside it. He is forgetting two things: first, and this might be debatable, it is private property and he is trespassing (although since the Island Corridor Foundation is in the hands of local governments, it could be considered that he – as a taxpayer – has every right to walk along it). Secondly, the inference is that railways are not useful: I suggest he sits beside the CP right-of-way through the Fraser Canyon – or better yet the Cajon Pass in California – and watch the mile-long trains line up to pass through. In Europe, too, the railways are very efficient, and carry both freight and passengers more safely and economically than by road. On R-O-Ws that have been “dating back to the 19th century”, heaven forbid.

What is a shame is that the aforementioned CP should have let the Island’s line deteriorate to a point where it is almost unusable. What is certain, however, is that CP found it expedient to let the provincial and federal governments expend taxpayers’ money on building roads, so that they could increase their trucking system at the expense of the railway. And I don’t hear Mr. Whyte complaining about us ubiquitous taxpayers having our money being spent on highways. I mean, he can get down to the malls in Nanaimo so much easier now, and his property value has increased with the influx of those of us who can get a better house up here than in, say, Victoria. Nor does he complain about the volume of trucks that pound up and down our highway systems: a 50-car train would certainly be more effective and cleaner than 50 trucks.

Should the Raven mine get off – no, into – the ground, I for one would be pleased if the rail line to Port Alberni would be repaired to take the coal, rather than the road to Port Alberni  being upgraded for the huge number of trucks envisioned.

 

Peter Blackmore

Courtenay

 

Just Posted

Second environmental march coming to Courtenay Sept. 27

March organized by the Youth Environment Action team

Commemorative plaque stolen from Sandwick Cairn in Courtenay

The peacekeepers plaque has been stolen from the Sandwick Cairn on Dingwall… Continue reading

Painter Fiona Ackerman starts North Island College fall 2019 Artist Talk Series

Acclaimed Vancouver-based painter Fiona Ackerman will join North Island College as the… Continue reading

Comox Valley Record readers ‘Take us Along’ on holidays

When it comes to spreading the news, readers of the Comox Valley… Continue reading

Teachers protest to get Courtenay-Comox MLA’s attention

Representatives concerned about class size and composition issues

PHOTOS: Young protesters in B.C. and beyond demand climate change action

Many demonstaers were kids and teens who skipped school to take part

Resident finds loaded shotgun inside a duffle bag in Kelowna alleyway

RCMP seized a loaded 12-gauge shotgun, ammunition, clothing and other items

Canada continues to win at world indoor lacrosse championships in B.C.

Results of the action from day two of the 2019 World Lacrosse Men’s Indoor World Championship

Graffiti, calls and Snapchat: RCMP probe string of threats targeting Kamloops schools

There have been nine different threats made to four different schools in the city

Oak Bay father’s testimony at murder trial like plot of ‘bad low-budget movie:’ Crown

Crown alleged Andrew Berry’s ‘entire story of Christmas Day is a lie’

B.C. truck drivers to face higher fines for not using winter tire chains

As of Oct. 1, not using chains on the highway when required could net you a $598 ticket

Singh campaigns in Toronto, May in Winnipeg, as Liberal and Tory leaders pause

All parties expected to be back on the campaign trail Sunday

Possible Canadian cases of vaping illnesses being investigated: health officer

‘I think that will be really important to address the overall trend of youth vaping’

Area 51 events mostly peaceful; thousands in Nevada desert

Three more people were arrested Friday on the remote once-secret military base

Most Read