Site of new hospital will lead to trouble

Dear editor,

I admire the ingenuity of building the hospital just a block away from the highest crash corner in the Comox Valley.

Dear editor,

I admire the ingenuity of the hospital selection board building the hospital just a block away from the highest crash corner in the Comox Valley.

When there are the inevitable serious crashes at the corner, they won’t even have to send ambulances out — just roll a few gurneys down to the corner! The savings will be massive!

Seriously, though, I would like to describe a scenario that is bound to happen if the hospital is built at the poorly chosen NIC location.

Let’s say Bob and I are paramedics and our ambulance and several others have been called to a massive accident on the highway south of Cumberland. There is a blizzard going on and there is eight inches of very slippery snow (the Valley does have major snowfalls, three feet in 1996, two feet in 1995). Driving is very bad and road crews are scrambling to try to clear the snow.

We get to the accident scene and load up some of the injured and head for the hospital. Along Cliffe Avenue the traffic starts to back up and we find out that there are several crashes on the 17th Street Bridge and with four lanes blocked, there is no way we can get across even with our siren blaring.

We head for the Fifth street Bridge and it is jammed up with traffic backed up to 14th street. We finally get across the bridge and head for Ryan Road.

We get to Superstore and look ahead up Ryan and gasp. There are cars strewn all over Ryan from top to bottom in the four lanes and there are snowplows trying to clear and sand the road and police and wreckers trying to clear accidents. It is total gridlock!

The only chance to get these badly injured people to the hospital is to head up Mission Hill to Veterans Memorial Parkway.

We have a hard time getting up Mission Hill, as there are cars sliding all over the road and there are a few accidents. After an hour and a half, we are finally able to reach the hospital but with the time delay, one of the patients has died despite our best efforts.

Bob and I look at each other and in unison say, “How could they have built it up here when they had all those other sites available on the Courtenay side with no hills or bridges?”

Of course, snow is not the only thing to cause delays on our bridge crossings.

We have recently experienced a month of repairs on the Fifth Street Bridge, which created long backups of traffic. The past few weeks there has been maintenance on the 17th Street Bridge with one lane blocked causing delays.

There has been much discussion of the pros and cons of one large main hospital between Courtenay and Campbell River or two small ones.

The sensible choice is obvious to have one large main one halfway with lots of specialists and the ability to do operations such as pacemakers, angiograms and many others that require going to Nanaimo or Victoria.

It has been pointed out that the larger central hospital would attract more specialists. We had occasion to experience this a few years ago when we were living in the Interior.

A fine young doctor who did locums in our town and his wife were doing medical specialties and were looking to establish a practice. They favoured coming to the Comox Valley and had heard about the large central hospital being considered.

He asked us a lot of questions about it and when we told him that two smaller hospitals would probably be built, he stated, “We won’t be going there; we need a large central hospital for our practices!”

We wonder how often this has happened!

Of course, financially it makes perfect sense because our provincial government has an inexhaustible supply of millions to burn! Let’s add $600 million (going on to $8 million to $10 million by the time the hospitals are finished by 2017).

Our provincial capital debt is going up like a rocket with decisions like this.

Bruce Jaffary,

Comox

Just Posted

The finish line! Huband held a ‘Colour Run’ Friday to celebrate what’s been a different school year. Photo by Mike Chouinard
Comox Valley school lets its colours run

Huband Elementary wanted a way to bring kids together

Cumberland has agreed to a sponsorship agreement with the Comox Valley Chamber of Commerce. Photo by Mike Chouinard
Cumberland agrees to sponsorship with Comox Valley Chamber of Commerce

Some on council did express concerns from the past such as amalgamation push

Habitat VIN executive director Pat McKenna, and community engagement manager (Comox Valley) Alli Epp are all geared up for the 2021 Habitat For Humanity Vancouver Island North #BidtoBuild online auction. Photo supplied
Habitat for Humanity Vancouver Island North online auction opens soon

Get ready to ‘bid to build.’ The 2021 Habitat For Humanity Vancouver… Continue reading

Ronan and his son, eight-year-old Erwan Teyssier ran The Cumby together this year. Photo supplied
Cumby Trail Race raises $15,000+ for Cumberland forest protection

The theme of The Cumby 2021 trail race was ‘Celebrating This Land’… Continue reading

From left, Karen Cummins, Suzanne Gravelle and Ted Grainger pose with the winner of this year’s Comox Valley Nature Tree of the Year contest - a western yew, located in the Cumberland Community Forest. Photo by Dianne Grainger.
Comox Valley’s ‘Tree of the Year’ unveiled

By Kerri Scott Special to The Record For the first time in… Continue reading

At an outdoor drive-in convocation ceremony, Mount Royal University bestows an honorary Doctor of Laws on Blackfoot Elder and residential school survivor Clarence Wolfleg in Calgary on Tuesday, June 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
‘You didn’t get the best of me’: Residential school survivor gets honorary doctorate

Clarence Wolfleg receives honorary doctorate from Mount Royal University, the highest honour the school gives out

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The Great Ogopogo Bathtub Race has been held in Summerland as a fundraising event. Do you know which Canadian city introduced this sport? (Black Press file photo)
QUIZ: A summer’s day at the water

How much do you know about boats, lakes and water?

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod laughs while playing with Lucky the puppy outside their Chilliwack home on Thursday, June 10, 2021. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
VIDEO: B.C. family finds ‘perfect’ puppy with limb difference for 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy has special bond with Lucky the puppy who was also born with limb difference

A million-dollar ticket was sold to an individual in Vernon from the Lotto Max draw Friday, June 11, 2021. (Photo courtesy of BCLC)
Lottery ticket worth $1 million sold in Vernon

One lucky individual holds one of 20 tickets worth $1 million from Friday’s Lotto Max draw

“65 years, I’ve carried the stories in my mind and live it every day,” says Jack Kruger. (Athena Bonneau)
‘Maybe this time they will listen’: Survivor shares stories from B.C. residential school

Jack Kruger, living in Syilx territory, wasn’t surprised by news of 215 children’s remains found on the grounds of the former Kamloops Indian Residential School

A logging truck carries its load down the Elaho Valley near in Squamish, B.C. in this file photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Chuck Stoody
Squamish Nation calls for old-growth logging moratorium in its territory

The nation says 44% of old-growth forests in its 6,900-square kilometre territory are protected while the rest remain at risk

Flowers and cards are left at a makeshift memorial at a monument outside the former Kamloops Indian Residential School to honour the 215 children whose remains are believed to have been discovered buried near the city in Kamloops, B.C., on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
‘Pick a Sunday:’ Indigenous leaders ask Catholics to stay home, push for apology

Indigenous leaders are calling on Catholics to stand in solidarity with residential school survivors by not attending church services

Most Read