Suggestion of blackmail unfounded and untrue

Dear editor,

Re: “Bias not a dirty word, says ex-councillor”, The Record, July 26, 2016.

Let’s talk about words. As a former leader of the BC Liberals and Comox ex-councillor, you will be well aware of the power of words and how they can be used to incite or defame.

Going back to your September, 2014 letter to The Record, you called Baybrook a “rotten, derelict building,” a powerful image, repeated in subsequent letters by several Baybrook-area residents. Emotive words like these probably went a long way in persuading the Comox Town Council to order the demolition of Baybrook.

The tragedy is that these words were not true. Professional assessments of this house, the original heritage home of famed Canadian Mack Laing, showed it to be sound and in good condition. In addition, both Heritage BC and the National Trust for Canada, in letters to Comox mayor and council, urged preservation of “this important heritage property” and offered assistance.

In your July 26, 2016 letter, we have your new attack word, “blackmail.” To say that I insinuated that the present town council had blackmail on their minds while choosing two Mack Laing Nature House Advisory Committee members is unfounded and untrue.

Do you even know what blackmail means? It means threatening to reveal damaging information about someone in order to extort money or compliance from them. There was no damaging information to reveal so blackmail was never an issue. My point was that the Town’s choice of committee members from two organizations that receive funding from the Town created the possibility for a conflict of interest.

Town council also appointed some members publicly known to favour the demolition of Shakesides. Bias in this case is a dirty word. Words like blackmail, rotten and derelict are always dirty words, especially when they are used untruthfully.

Marilyn Machum

Comox

 

Just Posted

Courtenay Elementary students lobby Town of Comox to clean up ocean plastic

Some Vancouver Island students are not just learning about the problem of… Continue reading

Relay For Life unites community

Before the start of Relay For Life Comox Valley 2019, participating teams… Continue reading

DJ Shub headlines Cumberland’s Party in the Park

On the weekend of National Indigenous Peoples Day, and the summer solstice… Continue reading

Asian business owners adapt to life in the Valley

Government program helps labour market

VIDEO: Huge crowds gather in downtown Toronto for Raptors parade

Mayor John Tory declares it ‘We The North Day’ after team’s historic NBA title win

Province comes through with funding for Charleigh Fales

Lake Cowichan toddler only one in B.C. diagnosed with CLN2 Batten disease

People throwing food at a bear in Fernie alarms conservation groups

“Approaching and feeding bears contributes to habituation,” says conservation group

Feds announce $50M strategy to fight dementia

Emphasis is on prevention and and supporting caregivers

Federal Liberals’ plan to help first-time homebuyers to kick in weeks before election

Ottawa to pick up 5% of a mortgage on existing homes for households that earn under $120,000 a year

B.C. VIEWS: When farmland protection doesn’t protect farmers

Secondary residences aren’t mansions, families tell Lana Popham

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Monkey spotted on late-night jaunt in Campbell River

Conservation officers also apparently looking for cougar in the area

Most Read