The other side of the GMO debate

Dear editor,

Re: Marching against Monsanto (Record, May 28).

Dear editor,

Re: Marching against Monsanto (Record, May 28).

It concerns me to read that some people are worried about the safety of genetically modified foods that they have taken to the streets.

I’d like to add to the conversation by providing some information that these people may not be aware of, but which may help relieve their concerns.

Canadians have access to one of the safest and most abundant food supplies in the world.

All crops, including crops that have been genetically modified, are subject to Canada?s strict regulatory standards. Extensive safety reviews are completed by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) and Health Canada to ensure all crops are safe for people, animals and the environment.

Crops improved through modern plant breeding enjoy a remarkable food safety record, having been grown for well over a decade and eaten by billions of people worldwide. In fact, regulatory agencies around the world as well as highly regarded international organizations like the World Health Organization, have all endorsed the safety of these enhanced crops.

Canadian farmers choose to grow genetically improved varieties of corn, canola, soybeans and other crops because they offer many benefits, including increased yields and improved pest control.

This is good for farmers but also benefits the environment by allowing farmers to grow more food on less land and leaving valuable green spaces and wildlife intact. Farmers are also able to minimize or even eliminate tilling the soil to control weeds, which enriches the soil and reduces greenhouse gas emissions.

Consumers benefit at the grocery store by having safe food that’s affordable with the help of plant biotechnology, Canadians save almost 60 per cent on their grocery bills.

For more information I would encourage readers to visit our website at www.croplife.ca as well as Health Canada’s website for more information.

Lorne Hepworth

Editor’s note: Lorne Hepworth is the president of CropLife Canada.

 

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