Whatever happened to working together?

Residents at Maple Pool Campground are caught in a legal battle between the City of Courtenay and the campground owners.

Residents at Maple Pool Campground are caught in the middle of a legal battle between the City of Courtenay and campground owners Dali and Jin Lin.

The City has initiated legal action against the couple because their property on Headquarters Road is inadequately zoned for occupancy, a technicality that could force 54 residents onto the streets if the court favours the City.

The Lins moved from Taiwan to the Comox Valley in 1992 and purchased the campground in 1996. They operate a Community Living Project for the residents, most of whom were homeless before living in trailers at Maple Pool. Rent is $350 a month.

If the Lins have to post eviction notices, Dali said all the tenants will end up on the street. Apartment living is out of the question due to a lack of money and, in certain cases, mental health issues.

Drugs and alcohol were rampant at Maple Pool when the Lins started the Community Living Project, but the situation improved thanks to the tenacity of Jin, who chased away the drug dealers.

Be that as it may, the Lins are technically at fault because they are not conforming with a bylaw and because their property sits on a floodplain, which could leave the City liable if an injury were to occur during a flood. But at worst, according to Dali, flooding at Maple Pool results in a foot of water.

In an effort to comply with the bylaw, the Lins hired an engineer to conduct a survey but the company quit the job, thus delaying the rezoning process.

Give the City credit.

Council granted the Lins about a year to come up with a rezoning plan. But the Lins need more time, and a reliable engineer.

If their tenants end up on the street, taxpayers will be forking out thousands to pay for service and other costs. More importantly, the 54 residents will again be homeless.

So how about working together to find a solution to expedite the rezoning process, rather than involving lawyers and legal fees?

reporter@comoxvalleyrecord.com

Just Posted

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

VIDEO: Care-A-Van offers more than just care in a van

Mobile clinic brings medical and social services to the Valley’s most vulnerable

Comox Valley Regional District seeking input on development of Tsolum River Agricultural Watershed Plan

This fall, the Comox Valley Regional District (CVRD) is inviting the community… Continue reading

Lane closure in Courtenay at Lewis Centre

The City of Courtenay will be working on the water distribution system… Continue reading

Comox Valley’s Rainbow Youth Theatre hosting 30th birthday party

Join Rainbow Youth Theatre for a 30th anniversary celebration at the Sid… Continue reading

Naked man jumping into Toronto shark tank a ‘premeditated’ stunt: official

The man swam in a tank at Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada

Transport Canada to take new look at rules, research on school bus seatbelts

Canada doesn’t currently require seatbelts on school buses

Courtenay’s Dingwall Road to be temporarily closed for construction

Next week, the intersection of Dingwall Road and McQuillan Road will be… Continue reading

Sockeye run in Shuswap expected to be close to 2014 numbers

Salute to the Sockeye on Adams River continues until Sunday, Oct. 21 at 4 p.m.

Michelle Mungall’s baby first in B.C. legislature chamber

B.C. energy minister praises support of staff, fellow MLAs

Canucks: Pettersson in concussion protocol, Beagle out with broken forearm

Head coach Travis Green called the hit ‘a dirty play’

5 tips for talking to your kids about cannabis

Health officials recommend sharing a harm reduction-related message.

NHL players say Canada’s legalization of marijuana won’t impact them

NHL players say the legalization of marijuana in Canada won’t change how they go about their business.

Automated cars could kill wide range of jobs, federal documents say

Internal government documents show that more than one million jobs could be lost to automated vehicles, with ripple effects far beyond the likeliest professions.

Most Read