Where new North Island hospice beds should really go

Not expecting much from a recent visit by two health officials, the Comox Valley Hospice Society was pleasantly surprised.

Not expecting much from a recent visit by two health officials, the Comox Valley Hospice Society was pleasantly surprised.

Delighted might be a more accurate description about how local hospice people reacted to an announcement that eight residential hospice beds and four tertiary care beds have been approved for the North Island.

While at the CVHS annual general meeting to update end-of-life (EOL) care in the Comox Valley, the Vancouver Island Health Authority’s (VIHA) director for home and community care and EOL care Lois Cosgrave and executive director of continuing health services Marguerite Rowe sprung the good news.

The euphoria and enthusiastic applause didn’t last long for local hospice society members working hard to provide EOL care at a Comox Valley facility designed specifically for that purpose.

While the beds have been approved, funding has not, cautioned Cosgrave.

Nothing government does happens without approved funding. The fact Cosgrave and Rowe said they heard about the approval of the beds just before the hospice AGM suggests a just-in-time delivery of a good-news announcement for maximum effect.

Cynical? Sure.

But that’s the reality of government announcements within a year of an election, especially one in which the governing party is hardly confident of victory.

Like so many other organizations, the Comox Valley Hospice Society must keep lobbying for funding — and for what it feels is a proper share of funded beds.

Cosgrave and Rowe couldn’t say how the beds would be apportioned on the North Island, suggesting four residential hospice beds each for the Comox Valley and Campbell River.

While it could create yet another unfortunate health scrap between the two communities, the Valley has a higher general population and a much higher ratio of elderly than Campbell River.

This is the basis for an excellent argument that more than half of the beds should be in the Comox Valley.

editor@comoxvalleyrecord.com

Just Posted

Market Day crowds flock to downtown Courtenay

Fifth Street in downtown Courtenay was packed Saturday morning as people flocked… Continue reading

Marine tourism a driving force for Vancouver Island’s economy

State of the Island Economic Summit takes place Oct. 23-24

19 Wing Comox welcomes new wing commander

Col. Dany Poitras assumed command of 19 Wing Comox

Pacific Salmon Foundation contributes $42,000 to Comox Valley wild salmon restoration projects

The Pacific Salmon Foundation announced it is contributing more than $42,000 to… Continue reading

Mount Washington zip line nearing completion

Once finished, the line will be the longest and steepest zip line on Vancouver Island

Jets host peewee baseball tourney

The Comox Valley peewee A Jets baseball team is hosting a 10-team… Continue reading

Canadian high school science courses behind on climate change, says UBC study

Researchers found performance on key areas varies by province and territory

Six inducted into BC Hockey Hall of Fame

The 26th ceremony in Penticton welcomed powerful figures both from on and off the ice

RCMP investigate two shootings in the Lower Mainland

Incidents happened in Surrey, with a victim being treated at Langley Memorial Hospital

CRA program to help poor file taxes yields noticeable bump in people helped

Extra money allows volunteer-driven clinics to operate year-round

Recall: Certain Pacific oysters may pose threat of paralytic shellfish poisoning

Consumers urged to either return affected packages or throw them out

How a Kamloops-born man helped put us on the moon

Jim Chamberlin did troubleshooting for the Apollo program, which led to its success

Sexual harassment complaints soaring amid ‘frat boy culture’ in Canada’s airline industry

‘It’s a #MeToo dumpster fire…and it’s exhausting for survivors’

Most Read