Three prime trout taken from a local lake.

39 inches of trout – and counting

I was casually looking at the solunar tables when I noted that on May 30 there was a major period beginning around 9 a.m. My next move was to carefully suggest to Elaine that it might be a good time for me to go trout fishing; although I rarely go fishing on popular lakes on the weekend. She agreed as long as I was prepared to provide fresh trout for supper.

On Saturday morning I left home just after 6:30 a.m. so I could find a place to park on a weekend. I arrived at my chosen lake shortly after 7 a.m. and was fishing by 7:30. One of the things that surprised me was that the parking lot was empty and I was the first boat on the lake. There was a brisk wind out of the Northwest and it was chilly in spite of the cloudless sky and warm weather forecast.

I started with my “go-to” caddis pupae pattern and a dragonfly nymph, both patterns on sinking lines. After a half hour of fishing and no action I changed  the  nymph to a  #14 black micro leech. At about 9 a.m. I had a firm hit on the small leech and eventually fooled the eagle and netted a prime 13 inch one-meal trout.

I noted that the bite co-coincided with the beginning of a major solunar period. During the next hour I took another nice  trout on the small leech pattern. There was very little surface action and I was beginning to wonder if the bite was going to materialize.

I had not had any action on my sedge pupae so I changed it to bright red leech pattern a friend had given me. I soon had a solid hit on the new pattern, but the fish didn’t stay around. As noon approached I netted another prime fish taken on the new pattern – from under the persistent passes of a determined eagle.

By noon I had three prime one meal trout in my fish box and it was time to consider my options. The picture with the column is of the three 13-inch trout that made for a memorable morning fishing. As I played the fish the eagle did its best to pick them off my line, but by allowing the fish to swim well below the surface  prior to netting, I succeeded in keeping my fish. A technique I use to keep the fish below the surface is to play the fish with the rod horizontal to the lake surface as much as possible, this tends to allow the fish to swim well below the surface as you prepare to net it. On this occasion it was three fish for Ralph and zero for the eagle.

When you find time to look at the world of nature around you, from the comfort of a small anchored boat, it is amazing what you see. I think I saw a first for me as I sat in my little punt and watched a small bat feed on insects along the shoreline at shortly after 12 noon. Another first  for this season was a large loon that came by the boat as I enjoyed my lunch. There is so much more to fishing than catching fish.

Last week I received a phone call from a fisher who reads the column and he recounted an experience he and his wife had on Maple Lake. They saw a small plume of smoke coming from a spot on the shore near the path. They landed their canoe and with plastic bags extinguished a small fire that could have had serious consequence for our Maple Lake forest.  A special “Thank You” to this caring couple – and a plea to smokers and others – PLEEEEEZE!!! be careful with fire in our tinder-dry forests.

 

Ralph Shaw is a master fly fisherman who was awarded the Order of Canada in 1984 for his conservation efforts. In 20 years of writing a column in the Comox Valley Record it has won several awards.

 

 

Just Posted

Two Courtenay Habitat for Humanity families receive keys to new homes

Lake Trail Road project officially has residents

Preparations ongoing for Courtenay’s annual Earl Naswell Community Christmas Dinner

The doors of the Florence Filberg Centre, downtown Courtenay, will open again… Continue reading

Valley woman found guilty on three charges following 2016 collision in Courtenay

The woman involved in a trial for a multi-vehicle collision in which… Continue reading

High winds force several BC Ferries sailing cancellations

Tsawwassen to Swartz Bay, Horseshoe Bay to Departure Bay, and Duke Point to Tsawwassen among closures

Swiss juniors train in Comox Valley

The Swiss national junior hockey team is training at the Comox Valley… Continue reading

Man dies after falling from B.C. bridge

Intoxicated man climbed railing, lost his balance and fell into the water below

B.C. animation team the ‘heart’ of new ‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’

The animators, largely based in Vancouver, ultimately came up with a creative technique that is drawing praise

Light at the end of the tunnel for UN climate talks

Meeting in Katowice was meant to finalize how countries report their emissions of greenhouses gases

Janet Jackson, Def Leppard, Nicks join Rock Hall of Fame

Radiohead, the Cure, Roxy Music and the Zombies will also be ushered in at the 34th induction ceremony

Supreme Court affirms privacy rights for Canadians who share a computer

Section 8 of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms protects Canadians against unreasonable search and seizure

‘I practically begged’: Kootenay woman with breast cancer denied referral to Calgary

Breast cancer patient left to fight disease alone after being denied referral to Calgary

21 detained before Paris protests as police deploy in force

There was a strong police presence outside the central Saint Lazare train station, where police in riot gear checked bags

Media, robotics, Indigenous studies coming to B.C. Grade 12 classrooms in 2019-20

Provincial tests are also being changed for students in Grade 10 to 12, the Education Ministry said

Most Read