The CVRR 32nd annual 5km Running Clinic starts Jan. 13.

Learn to run, have some fun

The answer to being happier is to hang out with happy people. The solution to improving health and fitness is to hang out with happy, active people. Come and hang out with us at the Comox Valley Road Runners 5km Clinic held at the Lower Native Sons Hall.

Did you know that 80 per cent of New Year’s resolutions fail by February? By signing up today, you will beat the odds. This community event will keep you on track for 10 weeks, from Jan. 13 – March 17.

The 32nd annual clinic is for runners and walkers of all abilities. There is no pressure, no judgment and no failure. You choose your comfort zone. You choose your starting point. You set your own expectations. Level one is for walkers interested in going the 5K distance, maybe with a few running strides here and there. Level two takes an active walker and carefully creates a 5K runner. Level three starts half walking/half running, so if you’re active and fit you can jump right in here. Level four is where you go if you run already. If you run at least three times a week and can already accomplish a 5K distance, you will graduate from this group with a much faster 5K time and, more importantly, the skills to continue building on your development.

All of this is provided in a supportive and friendly environment. Experienced volunteers will help you achieve your goals. Professional Comox Valley guest speakers contribute comprehensive information and resources for beginner and seasoned runners alike. We also serve plenty of laughter and cups of coffee after the runs.

Sharing experience, motivation and success is contagious. The positive energy and thrill of achievement on race day inspires continued active living and makes a significant contribution to the health of the community.

“I started running to lose some weight,” a clinic volunteer said. “I stayed for the fitness, fun and fellowship. Today I run because my quality of life depends on it.”

Registration is $50, to be paid at Extreme Runners or the Lewis Centre. Late registration is $55, payable Jan. 13 at the Native Sons Hall. The fee includes a clinic T-shirt and a runner’s manual/log book.

FMI: www.cvrr.ca

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