B.C.-grown wild meat a real treat

Majority of hunting is about harvesting organic grade meat for home consumption

  • Sep. 13, 2012 11:00 a.m.
A COLLECTION OF frozen food from our deep freeze plus fresh garden produce. In the photo is assorted meat from elk

A COLLECTION OF frozen food from our deep freeze plus fresh garden produce. In the photo is assorted meat from elk

Last week I highlighted some of the local wild meat that could be harvested in Region 1. This column will cover the rest of the province plus common species we can harvest within the balance of the province.

The biennial 2012-2014 Hunting and Trapping Regulations Synopsis is in some respects not much different than a shopping catalogue that we spend hours looking at in a dedicated effort to find the best deal for our interests, money and time available to plan successful hunts.

Climate change will have a positive effect on public perception of recreational hunting in so far as it will be seen as an economical way to control nuisance wildlife populations and harvest British Columbia grown meat – while taking part in an important recreational activity with significant economic benefits to the community and province as a whole.

Pictured with this column is a display of some of the wild meat in our deep freeze from past seasons. Along with the meat are some frozen peas and blueberries from our garden plus fresh vegetables. Our meat is vacuum packed and as such will keep its quality for more than one season. Displayed are moose and elk roasts, venison steak, three types of hamburger plus pepperoni, smokies and garlic sausage – all locally grown and harvested in our province.

As illustrated the vast majority of hunting is about harvesting high quality, organic grade meat for home consumption.

Regulation changes are high-lighted in green and a bold text. This set is awash with green print in virtually every region. It is paramount that you pay attention to these changes in any region you may wish to hunt.

Youth seasons are highlighted in many management areas. In Region 1 we have a special youth-only firearms season for antlerless black-tailed deer from Sept 10 to Dec 10. We also have Waterfowl Heritage Days for youth as listed on bottom of page 29. These special seasons are for youth under the age of 18 who qualify for licenses. They are quite generous. A point of clarification on local bag limits for deer, see the table on Page 17. There are also special limited seasons for seniors over the age of 65 in some regions.

A Thanksgiving wild turkey dinner is a possibility if you hunt in Region 4 or 8. It would be good planning to combine a deer hunt with a turkey hunt. Wild turkeys are now in sufficient numbers that there is a season as far north as Salmon Arm in Region 8 and throughout the Okanagan Valley and southern portion of the region. They are also abundant in Region 4 where multi-species hunts are possible.

Throughout the province black bears get an increasing amount of bad press. It should not be overlooked that they are important sources of meat in many places in our province. Black bears feeding on grass, berries and farmers’ corn produce excellent meat. Avoid harvesting bears around garbage dumps and salmon runs.

British Columbia is blessed with greater variety of birds and animals that we can hunt than any other place in North America. Our wildlife resources have a long history of being well-managed dating back to the wildlife management policies and practices developed by the late Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan and Dr. Val Geist, among others. The British Columbia Wildlife Federation has long been a responsible citizen’s voice in our on-going successful hunting regulations.

Climate change will effect our hunting in the future. The pine beetle invasion has clear connections to milder winters. The ecological impact of the loss of huge tracks of pine forests on wildlife populations is not yet clearly understood. There will be winners and losers – stay tuned.

• • • •

Important Event: The Pacific Salmon Foundation (PSF) is holding its annual fundraising banquet with silent and live auction and dance at the Filberg Centre in Courtenay on Saturday, Sept. 22. Tickets are $60 per person. Silent auction viewing at 5:30, banquet at 7 p.m. followed by live auction and dance.

The PSF in their annual magazine (celebrating 25 years – 1987 to 2012) reported on challenges and successes of the past 25 years and more importantly looked at the future of the next 25 years. Next week I shall try to convince you of the importance of supporting the PSF and its efforts to save our salmon – “A Keystone Species.”

 

Ralph Shaw is a master fly fisherman who was awarded the Order of Canada in 1984 for his conservation efforts. In 20 years of writing a column in the Comox Valley Record it has won several awards.

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

A vial of Oxford-AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine is pictured at a family doctor office, Thursday, Feb. 25, 2021 in Paris. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP -Christophe Ena
Tentative COVID-19 vaccine site chosen in the Comox Valley

B.C. is moving into Phase 2 of its COVID-19 mass immunization plan

Cumberland is considering downtown densification proposals, and with that comes questions around parking, among other things. Photo by Mike Chouinard
Water bottling ban, parking key changes for Cumberland zoning

Bylaw on amendments still need adoption following March 2 hearing

Arzeena Hamir, working her booth at the Comox Valley Farmers Market. LUSH Valley was recognized last month as a partner of the year by the BC Association of Farmers’ Markets. Photo by Bill Jorgensen
LUSH Valley recognized for collaboration with Comox Valley Farmers’ Market

They won Partner of the Year award by the BC Association of Farmers’ Markets

Chelsea Harry was last seen Feb. 21. Photo via Comox Valley RCMP
Comox Valley RCMP seeking help locating a missing woman

Missing person last seen in Courtenay on Feb. 21

A Coast Range Cannabis store has been approved for the Crown Isle Shopping Centre in Courtenay. Photo submitted
Courtenay council approves seventh cannabis retailer

Coast Range Cannabis to open second store in the Comox Valley

Health Minister Adrian Dix looks on as Dr. Bonnie Henry pauses for a moment as she gives her daily media briefing regarding COVID-19 for British Columbia in Victoria, B.C. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
7 additional deaths and 542 new COVID-19 cases in B.C.

Provincial health officials reported 18 new COVID-19 cases linked to variants of concern

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Preliminary design for a new composting facility at the Campbell River Waste Management Centre is ready to share with the public. Photo supplied
Facility to enable curbside organics collection in Comox Valley, Campbell River

The preliminary design for a new composting facility being built at the… Continue reading

The Regional District of Nanaimo’s board is forwarding a motion on illegal dumping to the Association of Vancouver Island and Coastal Communities’ upcoming annual general meeting. (Kane Blake photo)
Island communities asked to join forces in seeking help fighting illegal dumping

RDN resolution to be forwarded to Association of Vancouver Island and Coastal Communities

Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon speaks in the B.C. legislature, describing work underway to make a small business and tourism aid package less restrictive, Dec. 10, 2020. (Hansard TV)
B.C. extends deadline for tourism, small business COVID-19 grants

Business owners expect months more of lost revenues

Protestors against old growth logging gather in front of the courthouse in Victoria on Thursday morning. (Don Denton/Black Press Media)
Protesters gather at Victoria courthouse to oppose Port Renfrew logging

Logging company seeks injunction to remove blockades near its Port Renfrew operation

John Hordyk said it isn’t fair to just look at COVID-19 deaths as many survivors are experiencing long-term impacts, himself included. (Photo by Rachel Muise)
Not getting better: Revelstoke man diagnosed with post-COVID-19 syndrome

‘I hope the damage isn’t long term, but it could be permanent’

Mid day at the Vancouver Port Intersection blockade on March 3, organized by the Braided Warriors. (Zoë Ducklow photo)
Anti-pipeline blockade at Vancouver intersection broken up by police

Demonstraters were demanding the release of a fellow anti-TMX protester

One person is dead after a camper van caught fire Thursday morning in Victoria's Beacon Hill Park. (Nina Grossman/News Staff)
One person dead after vehicle fire in Victoria park

Investigation into Beacon Hill Park death in early stages

Most Read