insurance

Heavy machinery clears washed-up buildings and rubble in the harbour in Burnt Island, Newfoundland and Labrador, on Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2022. An initial estimate by Catastrophe Indices and Quantification Inc. suggests hurricane Fiona did $660 million in insured damage. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Hurricane Fiona most costly extreme weather event ever recorded in Atlantic Canada

Estimate puts the storm’s insured damages at $660 million

 

Tara Hartshorne touches a photograph of her daughter Chloe Des Rochers at a memorial at the corner of Ford and Nevin roads in Chilliwack on Sept. 20, 2022. Des Rochers was on a skateboard when she was struck and killed by a pickup truck driver at the interesection on Aug. 1, 2022. (Paul Henderson/ Chilliwack Progress)

Family of B.C. teenager killed by driver sees next to nothing thanks to ICBC’s no-fault insurance

‘The no-fault scheme is so unfair that the government was scared to tell the public what it is’ – lawyer

 

Arborists work to clear fallen trees and downed wires from damage caused by post-tropical storm Fiona in Halifax on Saturday, September 24, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darren Calabrese

Hurricane Fiona highlights gaps in insurance as climate change worsens, experts say

Flood policies don’t normally cover damages from storm surges, which are difficult to model

 

For 115 years, BCAA has been helping British Columbians move forward. The organization that started as a humble club of 11 automobile enthusiasts in Victoria now has more than a million Members, and they are not stopping there.

BCAA celebrates reaching one million Members with a made-in BC contest to win a unique prize

Canada’s Most Trusted Brand* has been helping British Columbians keep moving for over a century

  • Sep 12, 2022
For 115 years, BCAA has been helping British Columbians move forward. The organization that started as a humble club of 11 automobile enthusiasts in Victoria now has more than a million Members, and they are not stopping there.
Floodwaters are seen from the air in Abbotsford, B.C., on Nov. 23, 2021. November’s floods in British Columbia that swamped homes and farms, swept away roads and bridges and killed five people are now the mostly costly weather event in provincial history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Flood of atmospheric rivers in B.C. cost $675 million in insured damage: bureau

Increase over previous estimate due to business claims where commercial insurance is more available

Floodwaters are seen from the air in Abbotsford, B.C., on Nov. 23, 2021. November’s floods in British Columbia that swamped homes and farms, swept away roads and bridges and killed five people are now the mostly costly weather event in provincial history. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Debris from receding flood waters is pictured along a road as heavy rains form an atmospheric river continue in Abbotsford, B.C., Nov. 30. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

B.C.’s flooding was ‘most costly’ severe weather event ever for province: insurance experts

Insurance Bureau of Canada estimates $450 million in insured damage from recent flooding

Debris from receding flood waters is pictured along a road as heavy rains form an atmospheric river continue in Abbotsford, B.C., Nov. 30. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)
The Suncor oil sands facility seen from a helicopter near Fort McMurray, Alta., Tuesday, July 10, 2012. The insurance industry is grappling with whether to continue supporting fossil fuels in the face of the climate change threat. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Insurance industry seeks to limit fossil fuel exposure amid growing climate threat

Over three years, 23 companies have adopted policies that end or limit insurance for the coal industry

The Suncor oil sands facility seen from a helicopter near Fort McMurray, Alta., Tuesday, July 10, 2012. The insurance industry is grappling with whether to continue supporting fossil fuels in the face of the climate change threat. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
The head offices of Caisse Desjardins are seen, Wednesday, February 24, 2021 in Montreal.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Desjardins drops disease-related liability, property damage coverage for some claims

Company said it will not cover them in the event they are sued for spreading a communicable disease

The head offices of Caisse Desjardins are seen, Wednesday, February 24, 2021 in Montreal.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
A fire structure protection unit responds to a call in Campbell River. Mayors from smaller communities are voicing their need for more provincial funding to cope with the rising cost of fire services and equipment. Photo by Marc Kitteringham/Campbell River Mirror.

B.C.’s smaller communities want a better solution for funding fire protection

Rural mayors asking the province for help with the rising cost of equipment and training

A fire structure protection unit responds to a call in Campbell River. Mayors from smaller communities are voicing their need for more provincial funding to cope with the rising cost of fire services and equipment. Photo by Marc Kitteringham/Campbell River Mirror.
Doug Downey is sworn into his new role as Ontario’s Attorney General at Queen’s Park in Toronto on Thursday, June 20, 2019. A new bill in Ontario could make it harder for consumers to sue a business that was involved in the transmission of COVID-19, lawyers say. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin

Law to shield businesses that spread COVID-19 could benefit insurers, limit consumers

The new law comes amid concerns of the ability of businesses to keep people safe

Doug Downey is sworn into his new role as Ontario’s Attorney General at Queen’s Park in Toronto on Thursday, June 20, 2019. A new bill in Ontario could make it harder for consumers to sue a business that was involved in the transmission of COVID-19, lawyers say. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Tijana Martin