High Tide Pub promotes new menu and renovations

The High Tide Public House is pleased to welcome patrons to experience its new seafood-centric menu and recently upgraded restaurant.

Formerly known as Billy D’s Pub and Bistro, the new changes reflect an expanded business vision of longtime pub owner Deana Simkin. Customers will still enjoy many of the same familiar faces and features offered by the Fifth Street pub, with some notable improvements that include a modern interior decor, an expanded seafood menu, an extensive cocktail list, and a focus on local entertainment.

After six and a half years of owning the pub, Simkin felt it was the right time to improve the pub in ways that support her business values.

Through her work with the BC Shellfish Festival and participation in annual Dine Around events, Simkin has become more appreciative of the aquaculture industry and the culinary appeal of our local coast. By adding more seafood choices to the menu, she’ll be able to support local industry and appeal to customer preferences.

“We’re getting very positive feedback from our regular customers about the rebranding,” she said. “They’re pleased to see some new items on the food and cocktail menus, but they’re also glad to know that the staff and management are staying the same.”

The renovations will bring a fresh ambiance to a building that has been part of the downtown core for decades, and included creative improvements to the seating options, additions to the furnishings, and a new decor theme.

“We also used the downtime to build in new washrooms and to make some functional improvements to our kitchen, entertainment stage, and administration areas which will make the day-to-day operations better for the staff and for our customers,” said Simkin. “Whether you’re working to build a business or a community, both depend on your commitment to the relationships.”

“The High Tide Public House offers a welcoming place where people can gather to socialize, celebrate, or make a plan. In any case, they can enjoy a fine meal, hear some great local entertainment, and create positive memories. I can’t think of a more rewarding way to contribute to the Comox Valley.”

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