Amnesty International screens inspiring documentary

Gold Fever is an “eye-opening and inspiring” documentary about the impact of mining giant Goldcorp Inc. on a remote Guatemalan village.

On Nov. 12, Courtenay will join dozens of communities worldwide to screen Gold Fever, an “eye-opening and inspiring” documentary about the impact of mining giant Goldcorp Inc. on a remote Guatemalan village.

The screening, presented by Comox Valley Amnesty International and World Community will take place Nov. 12 at 7:30 p.m. at the Stan Hagen Theatre at the North Island College in Courtenay.

Following the 55-minute screening, Tara Scurr, business and human rights campaigner for Amnesty, will lead a discussion of the film. The evening will end with Amnesty’s famous dessert buffet (Just Desserts).

Admission is by donation and everyone is welcome.

“We believe that resource extraction is an under-reported issue,” said Monika Terfloth. “By hosting a screening of Gold Fever, we hope to shine a light on the harms to health, community and environment brought by transnational industrial mining and the connections to our own communities, including our Canadian Pension Plan.

“As part of a global action, we hope to raise visibility of these issues here in the Comox Valley and show our support, alongside dozens of other communities worldwide.”

Winner of the Rigoberta Menchú Grand Prix at the 2013 Montreal First Peoples Festival, Gold Fever is a hard-hitting documentary about three women resisting a transnational gold mine in their community.

Viewing the film, as part of global screenings this fall, is an opportunity to both learn about and discuss the issues, and to show solidarity with people — like Diodora, Crisanta, and Gregoria — experiencing globalized resource extraction.

For more information, phone 250 337-5412. See the film trailer at www.goldfevermovie.com.

— Comox Valley Amnesty International

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