BEHIND THE WHEEL: I can rationalize that behaviour

I glanced at the driver stopped beside me at a red light today.

He was busily chatting with someone via the cellphone that he was holding to his ear with his right hand. A marked police vehicle pulled up to our right and stopped to wait for the red as well. The driver beside me noticed, put his phone on speaker, held his hand below dash level and kept on with his conversation. The police vehicle departed on the green and when it was our turn this driver was rolling into the intersection well ahead of the light changing.

Coincidentally, I also watched a YouTube video this evening created by the Abbotsford Police Department. It’s two minutes of the best and worst driving excuses for the past year as heard by the officers at roadside. It is abundantly clear that some drivers do not accept any responsibility for their behaviour on our highways.

I’ve often described this as the philosophy of “I’m important, you’re not. I’m in a hurry, get out of my way!”

These people really do not care about sharing the road with you and me.

Both of these incidents started me thinking about my own experiences in traffic law enforcement.

It would appear that our government has introduced new legislation to control hazardous driving behaviour and there is more public advocacy for safer behaviour, but there is still no shortage of drivers willing to put themselves first. It’s curious that our system also allows them the opportunity to be the only instructor for a new driver, but I digress.

This article is the only action that I felt comfortable about taking to counter the driver on the cellphone.

Catching his attention and showing disapproval could invite road rage. Waving like a maniac to attract attention of the officer at the intersection was not likely going to be that successful.

In the end, it looks like he won. Maybe you really can’t legislate against stupidity.

 

Just Posted

Comox residents question redevelopment at emotionally-charged meeting

About 40 people filled the d’Esterre House in response to a community consultation meeting.

B.C. BUDGET: Surplus $374 million after bailouts of BC Hydro, ICBC

Growth projected stronger in 2020, Finance Minister Carole James says

Valley fossil makes it to the top of the provincial list

Courtenay’s elasmosaur will be added to the official Provincial Symbols of British Columbia

New exhibition at Comox art gallery opens Feb. 19

Rainforests to prairie grasslands, a visual road trip at Pearl Ellis Gallery

Comox Valley Chamber looks back on recent achievements

Chamber of Commerce Week Feb. 18-22

VIDEO: 8 things you need to know about the 2019 B.C. budget

Surplus of $247 million with spending on children, affordability and infrastructure

St. George’s hosts open discussion on Jordan Peterson

Based on the overwhelming response to the January discussion night on Jordan… Continue reading

‘Bullet missed me by an inch’: Man recounts friend’s killing at Kamloops hotel

Penticton man witnessed Summerland resident Rex Gill’s murder in Kamloops

B.C. BUDGET: Income assistance raise still leaves many below poverty line

$50 per month increase included in funding for poverty and homelessness reduction

B.C. BUDGET: Indigenous communities promised billions from gambling

Extended family caregiver pay up 75 per cent to keep kids with relatives

B.C. BUDGET: New benefit increases family tax credits up to 96 per cent

BC Child Opportunity Benefit part of province’s efforts to reduce child poverty

B.C. BUDGET: Carbon tax boosts low-income credits, electric vehicle subsidies

Homeowners can get up to $14,000 for heating, insulation upgrades

B.C. man survives heart attack thanks to Facebook

A Princeton man suffered a heart attack while at an isolated property with no cell service

Most Read