The Cumberland Village Market will feature more than 70 vendors.

Cumberland a bevy of activity this weekend

Market, parade and Thunderballs all big draws

There is no better place to be on the Victoria Day long weekend than the village of Cumberland and Village Market Day is a fantastic way to kick things off Cumberland-style. Presented by the merchants of Cumberland and their friends at Elevate the Arts and Currently Cumberland, Village Market Day runs this Saturday, May 21 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in beautiful downtown Cumberland.

Village Market Day features incredible merchant specials, delicious dining and drinking and over 70 unique vendors of handmade, homemade and fair trade goods and services. Shoppers will find book sales, jewelry, wood work, fairy wings, tasty treats, toys, plants and garden adornments, clothing and hats, art and pottery and so much more along the main street of the village.

The merchants, pubs, cafes and restaurants of the village are offering up a great selection for shoppers as well. Visitors will discover handmade chocolates, craft beer, fair trade coffee and so much more. Come and check out all the new shops springing up in the village.

Kids will enjoy the Bounc-a-rama, face painters, balloons, colouring tables and cool crafts to get their hands into.

Grab a snack and a blanket and settle in at Village Square for live music starting at 10:30 a.m. with a great roster of local performers including Maple Creek, the Emily Cars, Pamela Tessman and Easy Street.

Get your long weekend started on a perfect note this weekend in the legendary village of Cumberland.

Victoria Day Parade

The Cumberland Community Forest Society is participating in the Victoria Day Parade (formerly known as the Empire Day Parade) next Monday, May 23.

“We have a very exciting entry coming together complete with an adult performance troupe of bees (drones, maidens and a queen bee) and birds in full costume,” said co-ordinator Meaghan Cursons.

And there’s an opportunity for others to get involved.

“We are also putting out the call for little (and BIG) forest fairies, magical creatures and forest critters to join in,” said Cursons. “This year we will be choreographing the fairies and critters just a bit to have everyone clustered/closer/moving together for greater impact.”

There will be a dance rehearsal for the fairies, creatures and critters at 3:30 at the Abbey on Sunday, May 22.

This will be followed by a full rehearsal with all dancers (birds and bees) and helpers at 4 p.m. (all welcome).

Attendance at the rehearsal is not mandatory, but suggested, if you want to join the CCFS parade entry.

Parents accompanying little ones are encouraged to dress up as well (or wear your Protect Cumberland Forest shirts)

On the day of the parade, the group will meet at the Abbey at 9:30 a.m. Monday, May 23. For more information, there is a Facebook group at bit.ly/23VpfBI

Thunderballs

The third annual Thunderballs event takes place Monday, May 23, 9:30 a.m. in downtown Cumberland. This event features 4,000 golf balls rolling down Dunsmuir Avenue in an exciting race. The first 25 balls to cross the finish line win a prize. First prize is $1,000 cash.

Thunderballs 2016 is an important fundraiser for the Cumberland Community Schools Society (CCSS).

“This year we have an incredible opportunity to build on the generosity of the Mysterious Package Company, who have committed to matching ticket sales up to $20,000,” said CCSS executive director Sue Loveless. “Over the past year we have expanded our services and witnessed a significant  increase in demand for our programs. The success of this event will help to ensure that we continue to meet the needs of our growing community.”

This year’s event takes place on Dunsmuir Avenue between 1st and 2nd street, before the Victoria Day Parade and promises to be great entertainment. Tickets are $5 each, or $20 for 5, and available from Polka Dot Pants Consignment Boutique, Tarbell’s Deli, the Cumberland Rec Centre and at Cumberland Village Market Day (Saturday, May 21).

 

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