Everyone is welcome at NIC’s public screening of Birth of a Family followed by a discussion with local elders, Thursday, Nov. 23 in the Stan Hagen Theatre. (Photo: National Film Board of Canada)

North Island College presents Birth of a Family

Documentary of four siblings reunited after being separated by Canada’s infamous Sixties Scoop

Documentary of four siblings reunited after being separated by Canada’s infamous Sixties Scoop

Join North Island College’s Global Learning Initiative Thursday, Nov. 23 for a screening of the National Film Board documentary, Birth of a Family followed by a short discussion with local elders.

Betty Ann, Esther, Rosalie and Ben were four of the 20,000 Indigenous children taken from their families between 1955 and 1985, either to be adopted into white families or to live in foster care.

“Connecting with the last missing members of my family was a joyful relief, but the enormity of what we’d lost hit me hard,” said Betty Anne Adam in an article she wrote for the Saskatoon StarPhoenix. “More than ever before, I understood myself to be an Indigenous person in Canada. I realized that the broad outline of my life had been shaped by government policies. The weight of injustices against Indigenous people, current and historical, crashed down on me.”

When the siblings, now in middle age, met for the first time at the Calgary airport in September 2015, filmmaker Tasha Hubbard was there to capture the experience. She travelled with them to Banff where they spent a week getting to know each other, piecing together their shared history and reconnecting after decades apart.

Since premiering in Toronto’s Hot Docs in Toronto last May, the documentary has been shown in community screenings across the country as part of NFB’s Aabiziingwashi (Wide Awake): NFB Indigenous Cinema on Tour. It aired on CBC-TV this past Sunday and is being screened in the Comox Valley this week as part of NIC’s Global Learning Initiative, a student-driven project fostering awareness of global issues through partnerships with local communities and individuals.

The Global Leaning Initiative has supported nursing students’ experiences in remote communities in Uganda, Nepal and Mozambique and it continues to strengthen cultural understandings through field schools to Aboriginal and global communities.

The screening takes place in the Stan Hagen Theatre at NIC’s Comox Valley campus, Thursday, Nov. 23, starting at 6:30 p.m. with doors opening at 6. Admission is by donation.

Chocolate and coffee will be available for purchase at the event to support the initiative.

For more information contact NIC instructor Lynne Oberik at 250-334-5061 or email lynne.oberik@nic.bc.ca

Just Posted

Highland Secondary student wins Horatio Alger scholarship

Jenna Leggett grew up on Read Island where there was no electricity and no roads to her home

Next Science Pub explores sex, evolution and nature’s strangest dating scenes

The Cumberland Community Forest Society (CCFS) is presenting the next event in… Continue reading

Sprinkler system bursts at Florence Filberg Centre

Witnesses say water was pouring down from the building’s deck

Best of World Community Film Fest screens Tuesday

The votes are in from the recent World Community Film Festival and… Continue reading

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

B.C. athlete takes home gold in freestyle aerials at Canada Games

Brayden Kuroda won the event with a combined score of 121.65.

Cabinet likely to extend deadline to reconsider Trans Mountain pipeline

New round of consultations with Indigenous communities is coming

B.C. government provides $75,000 towards salmon study

Study looks at abundance and health of Pacific salmon in Gulf of Alaska

Murdered and missing honoured at Stolen Sisters Memorial March in B.C.

‘We come together to make change within the systems in our society’

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

The tricoder can test for biological contamination in real-time

Disgraced ex-Congressman Anthony Weiner released from prison

He was convicted of having illicit online contact with a 15-year-old North Carolina girl in 2017

B.C. communities push back against climate change damages campaign

Activists copying California case that was tossed out of court

Most Read