Pledge to protect our water

Make your pledge for Drinking Water Week, and beyond.

Make your pledge for Drinking Water Week, and beyond.

Pledge to protect our water in B.C. by taking any or all of the simple water-wise actions listed at www.drinkingwaterweek.org/challenge and be entered to win a water-themed getaway.

Just by submitting your pledge for 2013, you’ll be entered to win a two-night stay for two plus dinner at the Fairmont Waterfront in Vancouver, and a round trip for two on Helijet’s scheduled helicopter service between Victoria and Vancouver.

You’ll also a receive a 10-per-cent discount coupon for water efficient fixtures at any Splashes Bath & Kitchen Centre showrooms across B.C. Don’t forget to keep up your commitment to protecting our water during Drinking Water Week, and all year round.

One way you can help is to pledge to not put harmful substances such as cleaners, paints, pesticides and grease down your drain.

When harmful substances go down your sink, toilet or storm drain (or to the landfill), they eventually end up in our rivers, lakes and oceans, where they can cause environmental damage.

Fats, oils, and grease from food waste can also stick to the inside of sewer pipes and are costly for municipalities to remove. Compost food scraps whenever possible instead of washing them down your drain.

To find out where and how to dispose of harmful substances and household wastes, visit the Recycling Council of B.C.’s Recyclepedia at http://rcbc.bc.ca/recyclepedia.

Some chemicals found in household cleaners can be harmful to your health, and to fish and aquatic life. To find out which substances to avoid, and how to create your own environmentally-friendly alternatives at home, visit www.toxicbreakup.ca.

Limit your use of harsh chemicals such as lawn and garden pesticides as much as possible. Pesticides can pollute soil and groundwater, and can be carried into surface water by runoff. Learn more by visiting the Health Canada website at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca.

Remember to return unused and expired medications to your nearest pharmacy for proper disposal. Dropping off unused medications at the pharmacy prevents these substances from entering our waterways, where they can have negative effects on our ecosystems.

— BC Water & Waste Association

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