Comox Valley Nature hosts an online lecture Sunday, April 18, to address the human and scientific perspective on climate change. Photo supplied

Comox Valley Nature hosts an online lecture Sunday, April 18, to address the human and scientific perspective on climate change. Photo supplied

Upcoming Comox Valley Nature webinar addresses climate change

Comox Valley Nature hosts an online lecture Sunday, April 18, when Dr. Lynne Quarmby will address the human and scientific perspective on climate change.

The lecture entitled Watermelon Snow – Science, Art and a Lone Polar Bear airs from 7-9 p.m.

Given the current guidelines for COVID-19 prevention, Comox Valley Nature has made arrangements to have a live, online webinar for the presentation. To register, go to https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/6927747201992271885

Quarmby will be presenting her recently released book Watermelon Snow, published by McGill University. She presents a unique human and scientific perspective on climate change. It has been described by one reviewer as: “one scientist’s rediscovery of what it means to live a good life at a time of increasing desperation about the future.”

Quarmby is a professor in the department of molecular biology and biochemistry at Simon Fraser University. Her research is interdisciplinary and focuses on the interface of cell biology and ecology. One area of her research includes examining the single-celled green algae that grow on snow (snow algae) giving it a red, watermelon hue. The red hue reflects sunlight, increases the local temperature, and results in increased ice melt. The algae are part of a community consisting of fungi, bacteria, viruses and other microscopic organisms living in a nutrient-poor, low-temperature environment. Quarmby’s recent book combines science, an arctic expedition, the reality of climate change and climate activism.

This is an excellent opportunity for the public to learn more about the human and scientific perspective on climate change.

For more information on this lecture or other Comox Valley Nature activities, visit http://cvnature.ca/

Climate changeComox Valley