Brian Scott’s Filberg Lodge show will benefit NIC Foundation

Brian Scott’s Autumn Fanfare becomes Courtenay Slough when turned upside down. See it this weekend at the Filberg Lodge.

Brian Scott’s Autumn Fanfare becomes Courtenay Slough when turned upside down. See it this weekend at the Filberg Lodge.

Brian Scott will be featuring his “Harbour Reflection” paintings at his Filberg Lodge showing, and the North Island College Foundation will benefit from the show.

Scott’s showing is Saturday and Sunday from 11 till 4 p.m. at Filberg Lodge and Park in Comox, and 10 per cent of all sales will be donated to the NIC Foundation.

Scott loves the reactions he gets from people when he flips his Harbour Reflection upside down.

The distortion of the tidal action on the fish boats suddenly becomes a tightly defined three-dimensional version of the harbour scene.

The fascination for Scott is the fundamental contrast between organic (nature) and man made which is geometric based on the circle, square and triangle, mostly straight lines.  Organic forms, distorted by the moving water, move together, curving lines and repetition of forms. Much more exciting to the artist’s eye. Think of Emily Carr’s moving forest or Van Gogh’s distorted landscapes.

Scott’s feature painting is called “Autumn Fanfare” and when the painting is turned upside down becomes “Courtenay Slough” – one of Scott’s favourite painting sites. He signs the paintings in both directions.

“The joke is when you are having a party and your guests aren’t looking turn the painting upside down from realism to abstraction. If they don’t notice the difference then send them home in a taxi,” says Scott.