Feel art in every fibre of your being

Have you ever admired a piece of bobbin lace or petit point and wondered how it was made?

The second annual Fibre Arts Show takes place Aug. 20 and 21 at the Filberg Heritage Lodge in Comox from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The second annual Fibre Arts Show takes place Aug. 20 and 21 at the Filberg Heritage Lodge in Comox from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Have you ever admired a piece of bobbin lace or petit point and wondered how it was made?

Well, on Aug. 20 and 21, you can admire ancient fibre arts, watch demonstrations and even try creating something yourself.

The second annual Fibre Arts Show takes place both days at the Filberg Heritage Lodge in Comox from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. On Sunday, the British Car Show and Sunday Sounds with the Cure All Dance Band will add to the festivities on the park grounds.

Fiber Arts organizers are excited about sharing their skills and knowledge with the public.

Taking part this year is the Brazilian Embroidery Group, the Needle Art Guild, the Woolgatherers, the Schoolhouse Quilters and the Denman and District Lace Group.

Joining them will be Larry Manser, an East Coast rug hooking artist with a type of rug not commonly seen on the West Coast, and The Village Yarn Shoppe with a display of yarns and knitted and crocheted items.

Many of the fibre arts groups have been around for years, but the longest continually operating organization is the Denman and District Lace Group, which started on Denman Island 90 years ago.

Unlike most arts and crafts shows, none of the work is for sale. It’s strictly a demonstration and display to bring awareness of fibre arts to the public.

A dozen or more people, some with 30 years experience, will be working in the lodge and are more than happy to explain their craft and let those interested try it for themselves. Last year, a preteen girl gave demonstrations and mini-lessons on making bobbin lace.

“As well as showing our work, the goal is to encourage people to learn these crafts and hopefully join one of our groups,” says one organizer. “Although knitting has become popular the last couple of years, many of these old arts are disappearing, and we’d really like to introduce people to the fun and rewards of creating something with their hands.”

Originally fibre arts were started to fill a need but have now evolved into an art form in their own right. Members of the various organizations say they find their handiwork creative and relaxing and don’t want the art to die. They’re hoping to entice some young people away from their electronic gadgets and interest them in taking up a new hobby.

Even if you’re not looking for a new pastime, the show is great opportunity to see a range of fibre art, including weaving, embroidery, hardanger, lace, petit point and canvas work.