New film series launches Sept. 21 at Sid Williams Theatre

A brand new film series kicks off at the Sid Williams Theatre this fall. Sid Docs is a handful of documentaries that aim to educate audiences on the far reaching impact of the performing arts or peel back the curtain for a behind the scenes look into the entertainment world.

Sid Docs kicks off Monday Sept. 21 with Shake The Dust, a feature documentary film from director and photographer Adam Sjöberg and rap superstar Nasir “Nas” Jones about breakdancing and hip-hop culture in the most unlikely places. Ugandan b-boy Karim narrates this visually stunning tale that weaves a colourful, cultural tapestry of dance, music, and stories from the drug­and-poverty battered streets of Cambodia, the untouched wild landscape of Yemen, the almost utopian hip­hop scene in the underground of Colombia, and the embattled and poverty­ stricken streets of Uganda.

The film chronicles the influence of breakdancing and hip-hop, exploring how it strikes a resonant chord in the slums, favelas, and ghettos of the world and far beyond with a universally appealing energy, and acts as a positive force for social change.

“Many filmmakers enter into a place of crisis, and, with a multitude of motives good and bad, endeavour to capture nothing but agony and despair,” said filmmaker Adam Sjöberg.

“My goal with Shake The Dust is to demonstrate that suffering is indeed present in these third-world countries, but it is not the majority of what is there. When we are able to glimpse the whole of their experience – to taste their daily life, and seek to understand their culture, we can then truly show compassion.”

“[The film] uses breakdancing to show commonality in cultures that are affected by war, disease, and poverty. It seeks to paint a picture of the struggles the characters have – but only as a backdrop to the real story – one of hope and beauty.”

While filming, media interest in the project grew, and coverage by BBC World News and Wired magazine prompted hip-hop pioneer and rap superstar Nasir “Nas” Jones to get involved.

“What these kids are doing around the world reminds me why I fell in love with hip-hop and how important it is as a creative and constructive outlet,” commented Jones.

“After hearing Adam’s vision for this project and hearing the stories, I was incredibly excited to help bring the film to global audiences who need to hear this surprising message of empowerment.”

Shake The Dust screens Monday Sept. 21 at 7 p.m. Popcorn and prizes guaranteed!

Other upcoming Sid Docs include Around The World In 50 Concerts (Jan. 18), Ballet 422 (March 21), and They Will Have To Kill Us First (May 9). These films are fundraising events for the Sid Williams Theatre Society.

 

Tickets for these documentaries are $5 for the general public and $3 for members (plus fees). Purchase in person at the Ticket Centre Tuesday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., by phone 250-338-2430, or online at sidwilliamstheatre.com.

 

 

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