Reel Youth Festival arrives in Cumberland

The Reel Youth Film Festival pulls together an insightful, diverse, compelling and humorous collection of short films from across the globe. Photo submitted.

On Sat., March 3, the Reel Youth Film Festival, in partnership with the Cumberland Community School Society (CCSS) will provide a stage for young filmmakers to showcase their work.

The event takes place at 7 p.m., at Cumberland Community School, Beaufort Gym and is a fundraiser for the CCSS Youth Centre.

The Reel Youth Film Festival pulls together an insightful, diverse, compelling and humorous collection of short films from across the globe – all made by youth. Chosen by a youth selection panel from more than 1,500 submissions and almost 100 countries around the world, this collection will show you the world through the eyes of an incredibly gifted emerging group of filmmakers.

Whether it’s an immigrant’s story of building a home in a new country, Iranian children finding love at a busy intersection, or fruits and vegetables enduring the hardships of kitchen-prison, laughter and learning are guaranteed at the Reel Youth Film Festival.

Included in these films will be five films from local Comox Valley Youth: Tao Werner has entered a film each year to the Reel Youth Film Festival. He has consistently won the Audience Choice award and in his first year in the festival his film entry was selected by the youth council to be included in the travelling festival.This year he has created a music video for the song Murder of Crows by Corwin Fox.

As a 15-year-old filmmaker from Campbell River, Riley Teramura is the youngest filmmaker in the group.

“I got into filmmaking last year when I took the video production course at my school. I love being a director, actor and editor, but my favorite role is writing because I can come up the stories we film,” he noted. Teramura’s film explores the inner conflict between darkness and the light.

The impacts of sexual assault and the support victims need is told in Justina Scott’s film, It Can Happen to Anyone. Annelies Henckel is a 16-year-old student from Courtenay. Her film illustrates the struggle with depression and how it changes how we view ourselves.

Frank Goudie’s film The Aurum of a Hero showcases a girl’s inner conflict about her superpowers.

The Reel Youth Film Festival empowers young artists to express their creativity, entertain audiences, and share their visions for a more just and sustainable world. The festival is a model for community engagement, a celebration of youth culture, and a showcase for the richness and diversity of a new generation of filmmakers.

Tickets for the Festival are $7 for adults and $5 for youth. Tickets can be purchased at the door, or online at cumberlandcommunityschools.com This event would not be possible without the generous support from our local sponsors: First Credit Union and The Update Company. Major sponsors of the festival include Tides Canada Initiatives.

For more information, please contact Kate Ashton, CCSS Program Coordinator at ccss.youthcoordinator@gmail.com

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

North Island College announces 2020 graduation award winners

North Island College has announced the award recipients for the 2020 Graduation… Continue reading

Couple opts for plan B for wedding in Courtenay

Pandemic restrictions prompt April Powell and Hayden Eely to change plans for the big day

‘Someone knows something’: a look into Vancouver Island missing persons with interactive map

There are more than three dozen people listed as missing throughout Vancouver Island

Provincial COVID-19 data can now be used for B.C. to prepare for a second wave

In the past week, B.C. has seen a slight spike in daily test-positive case counts

Union Bay water plant now finished

Work allows health authority to lift boil water advisory

Islanders want BC Ferries to follow order that lets residents board before tourists

For ferry-dependent communities, ferries are often the sole practical lifeline to work, school or medical appointments.

Beverly Hills 90210 star’s family selling Vancouver Island Beach Resort

You can own Jason Priestley’s Terrace Beach Resort in Ucluelet for less than $5 million

Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

The kinds of genetic technology being used for this project did not exist when SARS hit Canada in 2003

Sports fishers protest Fraser River Chinook closures

Public Fishery Alliance wants hatchery fish open for harvest

B.C. Ferries increasing passenger capacity after COVID-19 restrictions

Transport Canada 50-per-cent limit being phased out, no current plans to provide masks

Amber Alert for two Quebec girls cancelled after bodies found

Romy Carpentier, 6, Norah Carpentier, 11, and their father, Martin Carpentier, missing since Wednesday

B.C. man prepares to be first to receive double-hand transplant in Canada

After the surgery, transplant patients face a long recovery

Grocers appear before MPs to explain decision to cut pandemic pay

Executives from three of Canada’s largest grocery chains have defended their decision to end temporary wage increases

Most Read