The Reel Youth Film Festival features short films directed by youth. Stock image

Reel Youth Film Festival returns to Cumberland

On Saturday, March 7, the Reel Youth Film Festival, in partnership with the Cumberland Community School Society (CCSS), will provide a stage for young filmmakers to showcase their work.

Most of the films seen today are made by adults – so what happens when young people sit in the director’s chair? The world looks very different to young people from Iran, Lithuania, the Comox Valley, South Korea and Vancouver, and their perspectives give rare insight into the next generation of leaders, change-makers and visual artists.

The festival pulls together an insightful, diverse and humorous collection of short films from across the globe – all made by youth. Chosen by a youth selection panel from over 1,300 submissions and almost 100 countries around the world, this collection will show the world through the eyes of an incredibly gifted emerging group of filmmakers. Whether it’s a group of discarded candies trying to make their way home, a lonely robot building a friend or wondering what would happen if computers had feelings, laughing and learning are guaranteed at the Reel Youth Film Festival.

This year there will be seven films from the Comox Valley as part of the festival. The films come from youth throughout the Valley and showcase a variety of ideas: should we start smoking, how safe is the Comox Valley, the importance of kindness, what would happen if the internet had feelings, an animation of the pied pipers story, the adventures of a courtesy umbrella, and the effects of mental illness on day to day life.

“The Reel Youth Film Festival is not only a way to support youth filmmakers, but it is also an awesome date night for you and your teen,” says program co-ordinator Kate Ashton. “What I like best about it is the amazing conversations that spark afterwards about a variety of topics that can be hard to talk about. Mix these in with some very funny movies and you have a great night out.”

The films are rated PG and have mature subject matter. The movies are best suited for 12 and above.

The Cumberland Community Schools Society would like to thank First Credit Union for being an ongoing and generous supporter of this event. Major sponsors of the festival include Tides Canada Initiatives and Vancouver International Film Festival.

The event takes place at Cumberland Community School, multi-purpose room, and is a fundraiser for the CCSS Youth Centre. The doors open at 6:30 p.m. Films start at 7.

Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for youth. Tickets can be purchased at the door, cash only. To reserve a ticket, email Kate at ccss.youthcoordinator@gmail.com.

For more information, check the event on Facebook: www.facebook.com/cumbycss

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