UPDATE: Two films kick off World Community Film Festival this Friday

The 22nd World Community Film Festival starts with two films on opening night this Friday.

FILMMAKER VELCROW RIPPER'S Occupy Love will help to launch the World Community Film Festival this Friday.

We regret that we received the wrong information for this weekend’s World Community Film Festival. Here is the correct information.

The 22nd World Community Film Festival starts with two films on opening night this Friday.

Reflections: Art for an Oil-Free Coast shares the story of an expedition of fifty artists into the truly stunning and remote landscape of British Columbia’s Great Bear Rainforest, a landscape they feel is threatened by Enbridge’s proposed Northern Gateway pipeline and supertanker project.

Big Boys Gone Bananas! chronicles a lawsuit against controversial food giant Dole, and their threats of legal action to quash the film’s release at the 2009 Los Angeles Film Festival and discredit the reputation of the filmmakers.

The filmmaking team behind Bananas! refused to be bullied, filing a counter-suit and launching their own media strategy. Big Boys Gone Bananas! is an in-depth case study of an independent filmmaker’s David and Goliath battle with a corporate machine.

Opening night usually sells out, so get your tickets early!

With over 30 films shown in five downtown Courtenay venues, Saturday is considered the main event of the festival. Themes such as community economic development, environmental issues, human rights, social and women’s issues, native rights and international solidarity are explored with passion, hope and creativity.

Saturday night’s feature film, Occupy Love, by acclaimed director Velcrow Ripper is a journey deep inside the global revolution of the heart that is erupting around the planet.

From the Arab Spring to the European Summer, from the Occupy Movement to the global climate justice movement, a profound shift is taking place. The film features some of the world’s key visionaries on alternative systems of economics, sustainability, and empathy.

Velcrow Ripper will join us via Skype for a Q & A after the film

When not viewing films, visit the Bazaar in the Upper Florence Filberg Centre where community groups will be on hand to give out information or to sell merchandise related to the various issues raised during the festival. It’s also a great place to relax, have a snack and meet new friends.

A festival pass for Friday and Saturday is $32, Fri eve $14, Sat 10am-10 pm $22 or $3 for youth on Sat and Sat 8pm $10. Tickets available at the Sid Williams Theatre Box Office 338-2430 or order online at www.sidwilliamstheatre.com.

See www.worldcommunity.ca for the film fest schedule and descriptions and links to trailers of the films.

— World Community Film Festival

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