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Hearing health is health: Kick off 2024 by prioritizing healthy aging

How healthy aging can help support Canada’s growing health care crisis
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Jeff Campbell, Owner of Ears to You, with one of his mobile hearing clinic vans that offer mobile hearing care all across the Island from Port Hardy to Victoria.

With those age 65+ making up around 19.3 per cent of Canada’s total population – the largest percentage among all age groups – healthy aging is more important than ever as Canadians work to meet the needs of our rapidly aging population.

“Some estimates are showing that by 2043, only about 19 years from now, one in four Canadians will be 65+ and it’s hard for many of us to fully understand the implications that go along with that,” says Jeff Campbell, owner of Ears to You, which brings mobile hearing care directly to clients. “Not only will Canada be facing a significant worker shortage, we’ll also being seeing an immense strain on our healthcare systems, which are already struggling.”

Campbell notes one way Canadians can start preparing for the major shifts in our demographics, is actively promoting and supporting healthy aging for seniors.

“Individuals age 45+ can start getting ahead of these future challenges by taking time to focus on their whole body health, which includes their hearing health as well,” Campbell says. “Hearing is a vital part of maintaining your independence and control over how and where you age but we need to start taking it more seriously.”

Campbell suggests everyone over the age of 40 get their hearing checked annually, pointing out that catching hearing loss early can help prevent further damage.

Why is that important? Hearing plays a key role in keeping our brains stimulated. Studies have shown that even minor hearing loss can contribute to early cognitive decline. Individuals with untreated hearing loss also tend to be more isolated and avoid social situations which can further escalate cognitive decline and increase the risk of mental health illnesses such as anxiety and depression.

“I always say our ears do more than hear – they play a key role in stimulating our brains and hearing loss can reduce that stimulation, which has been shown to increase the risk of illnesses like dementia,” Campbell says. “This is why regular hearing checks starting at age 40, or at the earliest sign of hearing loss, should become a top priority as Canada navigates the challenges of an aging population.”

Kick off 2024 by prioritizing your hearing health! Ears to You currently covers most of Vancouver Island from Port Hardy to Victoria – book your next appointment with the gold-star hearing experts online here or by phone at 250-619-5746. Follow them on Facebook and Instagram for the latest news as they continue to expand their services.

Join the team!

Looking to join the Ears to You team or learn more about franchise opportunities with this Island-born success story? Find information online here or reach out by email at mobile.hearing@earstoyou.ca.

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