Site C dam would create a third reservoir in the Peace River valley near Fort St. John

B.C. to announce Peace River dam decision

Site C dam is opposed by Hudson's Hope council, Treaty 8 First Nations and a group of farmers, some of whom would be flooded out

The B.C. government is expected to announce its decision Tuesday on whether it will proceed with a third hydroelectric dam on the Peace River.

Most recently estimated at $8.5 billion, the Site C dam would be one of the most expensive construction projects in B.C. history. A joint federal-provincial environmental review gave the project the green light in May, but the panelists were unconvinced that current energy demands mean it should begin construction in 2015.

The panel also highlighted the unavoidable impacts to aboriginal hunting and trapping territories in the Peace River valley near Hudson’s Hope. Aboriginal people in the Peace region say Treaty 8 guarantees them the right to hunt, trap and fish as they did before the treaty was signed in 1899.

Farmers in the Peace Valley Landowner Association are poised to go to court in an effort to stop the project, which would flood 83 km of river bottom land downstream of the two existing hydro dams on the Peace.

Hudson’s Hope Mayor Gwen Johansson has also been outspoken against Site C. She has joined NDP leader John Horgan in calling for the project to be reviewed by the B.C. Utilities Commission to determine if the power is needed before committing to construction.

Industry groups representing independent power have also lobbied the government to consider alternatives to the dam.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

2020 Hornby Island trade tokens of sentimental value only

The Hornby Island Token Project is in its third and final year,… Continue reading

Box containing hundreds of family photos found in Courtenay returned to rightful owner

Local media sources collaborate to solve family photos mystery

Two Comox Valley groups share annual Project Watershed award

Keep It Living Award given to Morrison Creek Streamkeepers and Comox Valley Land Trust

ATV crash at bottom of Mount Washington sends two to hospital

Two people were hospitalized following an ATV (all terrain vehicle) accident shortly… Continue reading

Game on! Outdoor pickleball season starts up in the Comox Valley

Comox Valley Pickleball Association members Evie MacDonald and Donny Cruickshank (near court)… Continue reading

BC Ferries losing up to $1.5 million each day as pandemic tanks ridership

The company does not qualify for the wage subsidy

Comox Valley business map offers information on local eateries, grocery stores and more

Search and click for hours and services offered during the COVID-19 pandemic

Facing changes together: Your community, your journalists

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the world in ways that would have… Continue reading

RCMP told of alleged assault in Courtenay hours after the fact

Police only made aware of possible attack through social media posts

Chilliwack school board censures trustee Barry Neufeld after controversial Facebook post

Board chair issues statement on censure but little else regarding Facebook post controversy

Twenty-nine of Canada’s 48 national parks to reopen to day-use visitors June 1

All national parks, historic sites and marine conservation areas have been closed for weeks

JK Rowling publishes first chapters of new story online

Book will be a fairy tale for kids and benefit those particularly affected by the pandemic

Tahsis opens its gates to visitors to save local economy

Seasonal local businesses that rely on tourism hope to survive despite drop in tourist numbers

Most Read