B.C. to introduce clean climate plan as carbon-emitting LNG industry grows

B.C. government officials said in October the climate plan will be designed to meet legislated targets, cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 40 per cent by 2030.

British Columbia is poised to announce its plan to fight climate change while it accommodates the carbon polluting liquefied natural gas industry.

Premier John Horgan and Green Leader Andrew Weaver are expected to introduce the government’s long-term strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through a wide-ranging provincial transition to a low carbon economy.

Environment Minister George Heyman, Energy Minister Michelle Mungall, Weaver and Horgan have scheduled a noon news conference today at Vancouver’s public library to announce the plan.

B.C. government officials said in October the climate plan will be designed to meet legislated targets, cutting greenhouse gas emissions by 40 per cent by 2030, 60 per cent by 2040 and 80 per cent by 2050.

Read more: Protesters confront Environment Minister in B.C.

Read more: B.C. government begins overhaul of environmental assessment

While details on the plan to meet emission reduction targets are expected to be revealed, government announcements have already been made to retrofit buildings for energy savings and to back a transition to zero-emission vehicles.

When LNG Canada said in October that it was proceeding with its plan to operate a $40 billion LNG export terminal at Kitimat, Horgan said the government would still meet its greenhouse gas reduction targets.

Pembina Institute spokeswoman Karen Tam Wu said following the LNG announcement that B.C. will have a long way to go meet its pollution reduction targets.

She said B.C. currently emits about 63 megatonnes of greenhouse gas emissions annually and its goal is to get that number down to about 13 megatonnes by 2050.

Tam Wu said to meet the targets, B.C. must accelerate its efforts to cut carbon pollution in the building, transportation, industrial and natural gas sectors.

The Canadian Press

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