If a bystander sees a dog in distress in a vehicle, the bystander is lawfully allowed to try and rescue the dog. Don’t forget to call officials. (Contributed)

BC SPCA launches #NoHotPets campaign this summer

Many dog owners don’t know how deadly hot cars can be, SPCA stated

The B.C. Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is reminding pet owners that summer temperatures can be deadly, especially for dogs left in parked vehicles.

The #NoHotPets campaign includes information on the dangers of dogs in hot cars, steps to take if you see an animal in distress and free car decals upon request.

READ MORE: Big White firefighters rescue frozen dog from ice

“Every year our constables receive hundreds of calls to rescue dogs in distress in hot vehicles,” said Lorie Chortyk, general manager of communications for the BC SPCA. “Sadly, some dogs have already died by the time we are called. It is so tragic because it is a completely preventable death.

“Even on a cloudy day, parked in the shade with the windows rolled down, a vehicle can reach temperatures that put animals in peril in just 10 minutes.”

READ MORE: A young Kelownian’s fatal overdose inspires community-service award

The BC SPCA advises bystanders to follow a two-step process if they see an animal in a car:

  1. Note the license plate, vehicle colour, make and model and ask managers of nearby businesses to page the owner.
  2. If the animal is in distress, call the police, local animal control agency or the BC SPCA call centre at 1-855-622-7722 as quickly as possible.

A heat stroke can be visualized in a number of different ways. If the animal has an erratic or rapid pulse, is salivating, anxious or heavily panting, a bystander is lawfully allowed to remove the animal from the car to a cool space, wet it with water, let it drink water or lick ice cream, fan the dog and bring it to the vet for further evaluation.

READ MORE: Okanagan owner reunited with stolen property

Just Posted

Cycle tour for African Grandmothers coming through the Comox Valley

On Sept. 6, 35 women, aged between 56 and 75, will be… Continue reading

Ferries employees participating in Denman Island cleanup for plastic-shedding ferry

The cleanup comes a few weeks after one organized by residents of the Island

Gallery accepting applications for Youth Media Project

The Comox Valley Art Gallery is accepting applications for the Youth Media… Continue reading

Ribfest returning to the Comox Valley

It’s fast approaching—the fifth annual Comox Valley Ribfest takes place from Friday,… Continue reading

Merville crash closes highway in both directions

There is no estimated time of Highway 19A opening to traffic

QUIZ: How much do you remember about Woodstock?

Weekend music festival in Bethel, New York, was held 50 years ago

Chrystia Freeland condemns violence in Hong Kong, backs right to peaceful assembly

There have been months of protests in the semi-autonomous region

B.C. VIEWS: Log exports and my other errors so far in 2019

Plastic bags, legislature overspending turn out differently

‘It’s just the freedom:’ Paralyzed Broncos player pursuing life on the water

The former Humboldt Broncos goaltender, who started in the net when he was nine, was paralyzed last year

Canadians killed in Afghanistan honoured during emotional dedication ceremony

One-hundred-fifty-eight Canadian soldiers died during the mission

It’s snow joke: Up to 30 cm of snow expected to fall in northeastern B.C.

Alaska Highway, Fort Nelson to be hit with August snowstorm, according to Environment Canada

‘I’m just absolutely disgusted’: Husband furious after B.C. Mountie’s killer gets day parole

Kenneth Fenton was sentenced to prison after he fatally struck Const. Sarah Beckett’s cruiser

Sea-to-Sky Gondola in B.C. likely out of commission until 2020

Sea to Sky Gondola carries between 1,500 and 3,000 people every day during the summer season

Helicopter-riding dog Mr. Bentley now featured on cans of new B.C.-made beer

Partial proceeds from every pack go to Children’s Wish

Most Read