This oil slick was seen at the airpark gazebo Monday afternoon

City of Courtenay management refutes staff comments regarding slick

Nature and cause of contaminant still undertermined

  • Dec. 13, 2016 11:00 a.m.

Record staff

The City’s manager of transportation and utilities is refuting comments made to The Record Monday regarding the origin of a contamination slick on the Courtenay estuary.

On Monday afternoon, Record editor Terry Farrell made a video of a slick flowing out with the tide, at the airpark gazebo, and immediately went to the City of Courtenay Public Works office, to question the contents of the video.

Staff at the office said the investigating officer was not in, but he was aware of the issue, and had attended the site of the slick. The office staff then explained the cause of the slick was due to contaminants picked up during the snow removal process.

On Tuesday afternoon, City of Courtenay manager of transportation and utilities Kyle Shaw called the Record, refuting his staff’s claims.

“There were a couple of investigations that coincided on one document that ended up being misrepresented by our clerical staff to yourself, which is unfortunate,” said Shaw.

Shaw went on to say that the City does not dump its snow hauls into the estuary.

“The city actually collects it,” he said. “The snow (from the weekend) hasn’t even been picked up, that I am aware of.”

He said due to the rate at which the snow is melting, the decision has yet to be made as to whether the plowed snow will even be removed, but if and when it is removed, it will not be dumped into the estuary.

“It would just be transported back to a public yard or a city yard and stockpile it and let it melt off there,” he said.

As for what the slick is, the investigation continues.

“That’s still undetermined,” said Shaw. “The statement I received from Dave (the investigating officer)… was there wasn’t a smell of hydrocarbon. Usually if there is a fresh hydrocarbon spill, you get that off-gassing of hydrocarbon, and you get that rainbow effect in the water, and although it was partially there, it was kind of mixed. So defining what it was without a sample would be difficult, but it didn’t give the element, or the nature, of a hydrocarbon still.”

So the nature of the contaminant remains a mystery.

“Or the source, for that matter,” said Shaw.

To see the video, go to http://bit.ly/2gIgi01

 

 

 

 

Just Posted

Courtenay widow turns to Town of Comox for commemorative item to honour late husband

After being turned down by City of Courtenay, Laurance Stratton found Comox more receptive

Boomer Jerritt next North Island College Artist Talk speaker

Acclaimed Comox Valley photographer, artist and world traveller Boomer Jerritt is coming… Continue reading

VIDEO: Saanich resident shocked when trespasser licks security camera, rummages through mail

‘I found the situation really bizarre,’ said the Gordon Head resident

School district launches catchment consultation process in the Comox Valley

Comox Valley Schools is commencing an important boundary catchment consultation process beginning… Continue reading

UPDATED: Town of Comox, RCMP complete investigations into allegations of staff misconduct

Mayor was unaware of any investigation opened by previous CAO

Environment Canada issues gale warnings for western Vancouver Island

Gale warnings in effect for most of Vancouver Island and west coast Mainland

BC Ferries crew member taken to hospital after getting struck by bow doors

Two sailings between Horseshoe Bay and Departure Bay were cancelled

Greta Thunberg meets with First Nations chief in Fort McMurray

Thunberg has turned her protest against climate change into a global movement

Canucks hang on for 3-2 win over Rangers in New York

Vancouver scores three times in first period

More beef products recalled due to possible E. coli contamination

The food safety watchdog has been investigating possible E. coli 0157:H7

B.C. VIEWS: How to get the best deal on your ICBC car insurance

ICBC slowly being dragged into the 21st century

Most Read