Fishing issues snagging treaty process

Treaty negotiations for the K’ómoks First Nation continue to linger, but Canada hopes to soon resume the process, once it sorts out fishery-related issues.

The negotiation of salmon-related fisheries issues at treaty tables in B.C will be informed by the findings and recommendations of the Cohen Commission — an inquiry into the decline of sockeye salmon in the Fraser River — says Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada.

“Its (federal government) priority is to ensure that fishery arrangements balance the rights of First Nations and all Canadians,” said Michelle Perron, media relations officer at Aboriginal Affairs. “We hope to be in a position to resume treaty fisheries negotiations shortly.”

Vancouver Island North MP John Duncan noted approval of the critical fourth-stage Agreement-in-Principle was reached “quite happily.”

Broader issues are now at the forefront as negotiations approach stages five and six — final agreement and implementation, respectively.

“Some of the local sticky issues — issues around Goose Spit — I think they’ve more or less worked themselves out,” Duncan said. “I’m actually delighted that the First Nations have a sense of urgency about it. I think that’s great.”

Treaty negotiations for the KFN began more than 18 years ago.

The AIP offers the K’ómoks people $17.5 million and about 5,000 acres of land, including the return of the tip of Goose Spit, which had been a contentious stumbling block. It also includes about 2,000 acres at the Royston woodlot, and land at Williams Beach, Kelsey Bay, the base of Mt. Washington and Lot BL7 near Union Bay.

With federal funds, the Province purchased the Sage Hills property in Royston in 2012. The acreage — which is adjacent to several parcels of land the KFN acquired from Kensington Island Properties — will be included in the final settlement package.

reporter@comoxvalleyrecord.com

 

Just Posted

Highland Secondary student wins Horatio Alger scholarship

Jenna Leggett grew up on Read Island where there was no electricity and no roads to her home

Next Science Pub explores sex, evolution and nature’s strangest dating scenes

The Cumberland Community Forest Society (CCFS) is presenting the next event in… Continue reading

Sprinkler system bursts at Florence Filberg Centre

Witnesses say water was pouring down from the building’s deck

Best of World Community Film Fest screens Tuesday

The votes are in from the recent World Community Film Festival and… Continue reading

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

B.C. athlete takes home gold in freestyle aerials at Canada Games

Brayden Kuroda won the event with a combined score of 121.65.

Cabinet likely to extend deadline to reconsider Trans Mountain pipeline

New round of consultations with Indigenous communities is coming

B.C. government provides $75,000 towards salmon study

Study looks at abundance and health of Pacific salmon in Gulf of Alaska

Murdered and missing honoured at Stolen Sisters Memorial March in B.C.

‘We come together to make change within the systems in our society’

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

The tricoder can test for biological contamination in real-time

Disgraced ex-Congressman Anthony Weiner released from prison

He was convicted of having illicit online contact with a 15-year-old North Carolina girl in 2017

B.C. communities push back against climate change damages campaign

Activists copying California case that was tossed out of court

Most Read