MARS inundated with fawns

Nearly two dozen orphaned deer at rescue centre

  • Jul. 2, 2015 10:00 a.m.

MARS is currently fostering 19 fawns.

Erin Haluschak

Record staff

 

Five times a day fawns at Mountainaire Avian Rescue Society are fed a fortified goats milk, in hopes of aiding their recovery for rehabilitation.

Each feeding requires not only food, but other supplies such as paper towels and toilet paper staff and volunteers use to assist eight fawns.

The Merville-based organization is nearly at capacity for the number of fawns they can care for, and are quickly using a significant portion of their operating fund caring for the animals, explained educator Maj Birch.

“It’s a daily expense; we depend on donations.”

They are seeking donations at a critical time, as they are hoping to aid as many newborn fawns while raising money for their MayDay for M.A.R.S. campaign – to assist in reaching a $350,000 goal to build a new wildlife hospital.

“The animal care certainly makes a hit in donations for the new property,” noted Birch.

“We are in desperate need for more funds, and we’re in an urgent position to build and move (to the new property) by 2017.”

In February M.A.R.S took possession of a 10.4-acre piece of property on the Old Island Highway in Merville, on the corner of Williams Beach Road and the highway.

The property was purchased thanks to a generous gift by a friend of the organization – Michele Woodrow – who bequeathed $300,000.

Currently, the focus is on the fawns, with a plea for donations of any kind, including puppy pens – even on loan – from the public in order to properly house and separate the deer to lower the risk of disease or infections spreading.

So far since May 3, the organization has dealt with 19 fawns. Birch said it’s common to see fawns alone in the forest, and warns the public to leave them alone if away from a highway or out of danger.

“The mom usually goes away, and if it stays (near the fawn), it just attracts predators. Sometimes you’ll find them in long grass, sometimes in the forest.”

If fawns are found near warm roadways, she encourages people to help move the fawns away – ideally with a blanket or on their own, but added people can pick them up and move them into the forest.

“Their mom will find them. We’ve had a lot of success putting them back. It’s a myth that humans will transfer smell (onto the deer).”

The recovery time spent by fawns at the centre is about six weeks before they get transferred to another location in the Valley for a slow release.

To donate or for more information, visit wingtips.org.

 

Just Posted

YANA Ride in Comox raises thousands for families with medical needs

In its seventh year, the event attracted the maximum 600 riders on Sunday

Cycle tour for African Grandmothers coming through the Comox Valley

On Sept. 6, 35 women, aged between 56 and 75, will be… Continue reading

Ferries employees participating in Denman Island cleanup for plastic-shedding ferry

The cleanup comes a few weeks after one organized by residents of the Island

Gallery accepting applications for Youth Media Project

The Comox Valley Art Gallery is accepting applications for the Youth Media… Continue reading

YANA Ride in Comox raises thousands for families with medical needs

In its seventh year, the event attracted the maximum 600 riders on Sunday

Maxime Bernier tells party faithful he will make it into the leaders’ debates

The People’s Party of Canada does not meet the current requirements

15-year-old boy drowns after midnight jump into Okanagan Lake

The RCMP and BC Coroners Service are investigating the drowning.

U16 B.C. fastpitch team named national champs

Girls went undefeated at national tournament in Calgary

PHOTOS: Cumberland Wild embraces diverse musical talents

Day 1 of the two-day music festival took place Saturday

Advocates ‘internationalize’ the fight to free Raif Badawi from Saudi prison

Raif Badawi was arrested on June 17, 2012, and was later sentenced to 1,000 lashes and 10 years in jail for his online criticism of Saudi clerics

Canadian entrepreneurs turning beer byproduct into bread, cookies and profits

Some breweries turn to entrepreneurs looking to turn spent grain into treats for people and their pets

Most Read