McRae’s ministry employment bettering services for adults with developmental disabilities

Community Living BC’s employment strategy has invested $100,000 to support a pilot project to improve employment services.

Community Living BC’s employment strategy has invested $100,000 to support a pilot project to improve employment services for adults with developmental disabilities.

Earlier this year, CLBC implemented a three-year Community Action Employment Plan with three regional pilot projects, including one on Central and Upper Vancouver Island. These pilots will create inclusive employment strategies, establish regional job targets and develop best practices.

The plan has established a target of 1,200 jobs for adults with developmental disabilities over the next three years.

“There’s a real opportunity for these individuals to get a great resource and support network in our community,” said Social Development and Social Innovation Minister/Comox Valley MLA Don McRae, who is touring the province in conjunction with Community Living Month in October.

“A lot of it is support, and working with employers themselves. Everybody wants to contribute to society.”

Dedicated funding for the region will support a localized employment strategy. Focus will be on unique qualities, employers and needs of the area. It will also raise awareness of the contributions adults with developmental disabilities can make in workplaces, and build service provider capacity to help adults who want to work.

Progress to date since the pilot was announced in April includes:

• Established employment services for the first time in Port Hardy;

• Organized training opportunities for contracted service providers to better assist adults with developmental disabilities in self employment;

• Hired a full-time regional co-ordinator;

• Initiated consultation with self-advocates, school district officials, the Ministry of Children and Families, Employment Program of BC, employers, MLAs and community councils to start mapping local resources, capacity and activities for employment.

This work complements a range of supports CLBC provides to more than 15,000 adults with developmental disabilities in B.C. through a network of contracted service providers and community offices.

reporter@comoxvalleyrecord.com

 

Just Posted

Sprinkler system bursts at Florence Filberg Centre

Witnesses say water was pouring down from the building’s deck

Crews begin cutting down 100-year-old Comox willow tree

The tree was determined to be unhealthy and is being cut down due to safety concerns

Best of World Community Film Fest screens Tuesday

The votes are in from the recent World Community Film Festival and… Continue reading

Merville resident looking for help to name original settler families

Janice Isenor is hoping to figure out which families settled where in Merville 100 years ago

Cultural sharing for Comox Valley School District song unveiling

After nearly a year in the making, a special gift was presented… Continue reading

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

Ammonia leak shuts down curling club in Nelson

It’s not yet clear when the leak was detected

Pavelski’s 31st goal helps Sharks top Canucks 3-2

Vancouver one point out of second NHL wild-card spot

Eight cases of measles confirmed in Vancouver outbreak

Coastal Health official say the cases stem from the French-language Ecole Jules Verne Secondary

Ontario police field complaints over Amber Alert for missing girl, 11, found dead

Some said the Amber Alert issued late Thursday for Riya Rajkumar disrupted their sleep

Former B.C. premier Gordon Campbell accused of sexual touching

Accuser went to police, interviewed by Britian’s Daily Telegraph

B.C. couple attacked with acid, slashed with knife in Vietnam

Warning, graphic images: Man has burns on 80 per cent of his body, slashed with knife

Northern B.C. First Nation clan says ancient tools found at pipeline work site

Archeologists from the Smithsonian Institute estimate one of the stones found dates back up to 3500 years

Most Read