Mounties cleared after shooting B.C. man armed with toy gun

Independent Investigations Office reports it will pass on a report to Crown counsel

Mounties who shot at a Burnaby man armed with a toy gun in 2015 used reasonable force, B.C.’s police watchdog says.

A report released Tuesday by the Independent Investigations Office said because police arrived on scene believing that the man had a real gun, they were justified in shooting at him.

Officers were sent to the 9300 block of Salish Court, near Lougheed Town Centre, on the night of March 2015 after a 911 caller reported that a man told her he would shoot her and showed off a black handgun, the report said.

The suspect told the woman to call police, before saying she “was not in trouble” and walking away.

The RCMP said because the man wanted them to show up, they were worried that he was looking for a confrontation, and so escalated their response.

When officers arrived, they found the man in a vehicle. They told him to drop the gun and leave the car.

Instead, the man pointed the gun at his head and stayed put.

Police told the IIO he pointed the gun at officers, causing police to shoot him.

The man was struck by multiple bullets before police took him into custody and he was taken to hospital.

After the first round of gunfire, police said they once again told the man to “drop the weapon” and when he didn’t, fired another round of shots.

The man then dropped the gun, got out of the car and fell onto the gun before dragging himself away from the weapon and putting his arms above his head.

An officer then ran to the man, handcuffed him and began to offer first aid and reassurance.

Once police searched the man and found just the toy gun and no other weapons, police removed the cuffs.

In speaking with the police watchdog, the man said he did not threaten the 911 caller.

He told investigators that when the police told him to drop the gun, he told them it was a toy and that he was unarmed.

“Guys just shoot me, I’m not causing a fight… I just don’t want to suffer anymore,” the report said he told investigators.

The report noted, however, that he said he was not suicidal at the time, nor did he plan to hurt police.


@katslepian

katya.slepian@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Highland Secondary student wins Horatio Alger scholarship

Jenna Leggett grew up on Read Island where there was no electricity and no roads to her home

Next Science Pub explores sex, evolution and nature’s strangest dating scenes

The Cumberland Community Forest Society (CCFS) is presenting the next event in… Continue reading

Sprinkler system bursts at Florence Filberg Centre

Witnesses say water was pouring down from the building’s deck

Best of World Community Film Fest screens Tuesday

The votes are in from the recent World Community Film Festival and… Continue reading

B.C. students win Great Waters Challenge video contest

Video, mural and song about saving the salmon claims the top prize

B.C. athlete takes home gold in freestyle aerials at Canada Games

Brayden Kuroda won the event with a combined score of 121.65.

Cabinet likely to extend deadline to reconsider Trans Mountain pipeline

New round of consultations with Indigenous communities is coming

B.C. government provides $75,000 towards salmon study

Study looks at abundance and health of Pacific salmon in Gulf of Alaska

Murdered and missing honoured at Stolen Sisters Memorial March in B.C.

‘We come together to make change within the systems in our society’

UBC researchers develop inexpensive tool to test drinking water

The tricoder can test for biological contamination in real-time

Disgraced ex-Congressman Anthony Weiner released from prison

He was convicted of having illicit online contact with a 15-year-old North Carolina girl in 2017

B.C. communities push back against climate change damages campaign

Activists copying California case that was tossed out of court

Most Read