NIC brings Likʷala/Kwak’wala and Nuu-chah-nulth language courses to campus

  • Dec. 14, 2018 6:00 a.m.

The Comox Valley campus of North Island College. (File photo)

NIC will offer introductory Likʷala /Kwak’wala and Nuu-chah-nulth language courses in Campbell River and the Comox Valley for the first time this January.

“I am excited and grateful that we are able to offer these beginning language courses in Campbell River and the Comox Valley,” said NIC Adult Basic Education instructor Sara Child, who developed the Kwak’wala course.

“These courses support adult learners in obtaining relevant credits to achieve their Dogwood diploma,” she added. “But, more importantly, they help our students and communities by supporting revitalization of our precious languages.”

NIC first offered the courses in Port Hardy and Port Alberni, as part of its commitment to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s 94 Calls to Action, including the development of programs, courses and research opportunities informed by Aboriginal ways of knowing and being.

Both courses are tuition-free. They are based on immersive learning and listening techniques. They are scheduled weekday evenings to allow people working during the day to attend. The first classes begin the week of January 14 and everyone is invited to participate.

The Campbell River campus sits on the traditional territory of the Ligʷiłdax̌ʷ Nation where the dialect is Likʷala. The Introduction to Kwak’wala (KWA-096) course incorporates the Likʷala language and brings local speakers and those with language knowledge into the classroom.

It is available at the Comox Valley and Campbell River campuses and focuses on the basic conversation, structure and pronunciation of Kwak’wala in a setting focused on listening and speaking. Topics include greetings, social interactions, community and more. Students will also learn about the vital role of the language to Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw First Nation members and develop strategies to support learning their Indigenous languages.

Meaning “all along the mountains and sea,” the Nuu-chah-nulth language is spoken by 14 Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations made up of 10,000 members in three regions on Vancouver Island’s West Coast.

Introduction to Nuu-Chah-nulth Language (NCN-096) is offered at NIC’s Campbell River campus and allow students to develop listening techniques to compare and contrast Nuu-chah-nulth and English sound patterns and pronunciation, as well as learn words phrases and greetings to communicate at home, in class and with Elders.

To learn more about the courses or to register, visit www.nic.bc.ca/aboriginal-education/aboriginal-curriculum/.

Just Posted

VIDEO: Comox Valley welcomes Eritrean refugees

Organizer Idris also fled Eritrea back in 2008

Aid a priority for idled Vancouver Island loggers, John Horgan says

Steelworkers, Western Forest Products returning to mediation

McKinnon joins Habitat for Humanity Vancouver Island North team

Karen McKinnon has joined Habitat for Humanity Vancouver Island North (Habitat VIN)… Continue reading

Everybody Deserves a Smile’s 2019 campaign coming to fruition

The 2019 Everybody Deserves a Smile campaign is reaching its crescendo. Thursday… Continue reading

Filling the need for growing senior home care in the Comox Valley

Tracie Robertson and Melissa King recently opened Home Instead Senior Care

VIDEO: These are the top toys this Christmas, B.C. toy experts say

Consider the play value of a game, staff at Toy Traders say

Comox Valley RCMP issue arrest warrant for local man

Comox Valley RCMP warrant of the week

Prince George RCMP use bait packages to catch porch pirates over the holidays

First-in-Canada program with Amazon looks to combat parcel theft

Nanaimo mechanical engineer creates thief tracking program

Nanaimo Thief Tracking lets users plot and share information about thefts online

Mayor wants B.C. to institutionalize severely mental ill people who are homeless

Those suffering from mental health conditions, such as schizophrenia, need specialized care, mayor says

Five things of note from Trudeau’s mandate letters to his ministers

Some marching orders come from the Liberal Party’s campaign, while others are new additions

Scheer’s resignation tips party into internal war over school tuition payments

The Conservatives have a Toronto convention already scheduled for April

Navigating ‘fever phobia’: B.C. doctor gives tips on when a sick kid should get to the ER

Any temperature above 38 C is considered a fever, but not all cases warrant a trip to the hospital

Most Read