Joanne Schroeder shows the massive Roy Randell painting donated to the silent auction for this year’s Telethon

Joanne Schroeder shows the massive Roy Randell painting donated to the silent auction for this year’s Telethon

Telethon celebrates four decades of fundraising for children

40th Comox Valley Child Development Association Telethon goes Sunday

  • Oct. 28, 2015 5:00 p.m.

Terry Farrell

Record staff

A November tradition four decades old returns to the Sid Williams Theatre Sunday as the 40th annual Comox Valley Child Development Association Telethon takes over the hallowed halls of Courtenay’s famed landmark.

The theme this year is “Celebrate” and CVCDA executive director Joanne Schroeder said the committee is sticking with the tried and true formula.

“There’s nothing new per se this year – we are really trying to focus on celebrating the tradition,” said Schroeder. “The one thing we will do a little differently is that we plan on taking a little more time to honour the Baynes Sound Lions and the other groups and people that have been giving money for years and years and years.”

When it comes to celebrating the tradition, there is little, if anything, more relevant than the Baynes Sound Lions.

The service group from Fanny Bay has one of the most inspiring and successful Telethon traditions going.

For 39 years, Baynes Sound Lions members have pushed a wheelbarrow from Fanny Bay to Courtenay, collecting funds along the way.

There are miniature wooden wheelbarrows set up at checkpoints on the route all year long, into which people donate coins. The Lions start the day with an empty wheelbarrow and by the time they get to the Sid Williams Theatre (it takes about eight hours to walk the 32 kilometre route), the wheelbarrow is full.

The Baynes Sound Lions estimate they have collected more than $200,000 for the CVCDA through their wheelbarrow walk.

“They have been really amazing over the years,” said CVCDA board president Pam Crowe. “They don’t ask us for anything – they just do their walk, rain or shine… they really are the epitome of volunteerism. What they do is very selfless. It’s what it’s all about.”

Crowe said the “grand entrance” of the Baynes Sound Lions and their wheelbarrow has become an anticipated moment for everyone involved in the Telethon.

“Usually at about 3:30 we look to get an update on where they are,” said Crowe. “When they get here, they immediately go downstairs and start counting like crazy, then they come up to the stage with the big reveal. It is very much anticipated – not so much because of the total, but really, because it’s such a great effort. It’s very unique. It’s very ‘small town’ and it’s very heartwarming.”

The Tin Grin Cup remains the largest single donation in the history of the Telethon, cracking the $26,000 mark one year. The Tin Grin Cup was a golf tournament held on the first Monday of September, organized by Dr. Paul Helpard of Shoreline Orthodontics.

“He (Helpard) would organize the dental community for this golf tournament at Crown Isle,” said Crowe. “That (fundraiser) hovered around $20,000 for quite a few years, so that was a huge start for us.

”The Helpards continue to be huge supporters of the CDA.”

The Telethon has stayed true to its local roots for entertainment purposes throughout its history and this Sunday’s milestone Telethon will be no different.

Helen Austin and Sue Finneron will host the first four hours of the Telethon, with Kenny Shaw and Gayle Bates hosting the second half.

Entertainers will include the  Georgia Strait Jazz, the Comox Valley Children’s Choir, Doug Cox, Brodie Dawson, Luc Blu Guthrie, Sue Medley and just about every dance troupe in the Valley.

(Full entertainment schedule at bottom of page)

The entertainment is a big reason for people to go to the Telethon, and the CDA has a special treat for any kids who are in attendance.

“We will be having a draw of both a boys’ and a girls’ bike at 5 p.m. – free for someone in attendance,” said Schroeder. “All the kids who are in the theatre will be eligible for the draw.”

The silent auction is always one of the big fundraising efforts the day of the Telethon. The list of items that will be up for grabs at this year’s silent auction continues to grow.

WestJet has stepped up again this year, offering two tickets anywhere WestJet flies. For the sports enthusiasts, there are tickets to the Vancouver Canucks games, as well as tickets to the BC Lions games.

“We have this huge, eight-foot by five-foot original painting by Roy Randell, who has always donated to us,” said Schroeder. “We have a gourmet dinner for six, prepared in your home by one of our local chefs. We have some beautiful silver jewelry from I-Hos Gallery.”

There is also a two-night stay in Ucluelet, among other items.

“People will be able to bid over the phone, live at the theatre, and online,” said Schroeder.

The plan is to close the phone and online bidding half an hour before the live bidding closes, so if there’s something particularly desirable to you, the best place to be is at the Sid Williams Theatre.

Raffle basket

How about doing all your Christmas shopping at once? The raffle basket has something for nearly everyone on your Christmas list. There are upwards of 50 prizes in the raffle basket, with everything from rounds of golf at three different courses (Comox, Sunnydale and Storey Creek), to a handmade quilt courtesy of Linda Hamilton. There are gift certificates to many local restaurants and stores, massages, books and games – and one winner takes it all. Tickets for the raffle basket will be available at the Telethon – $2 apiece, or three for $5.

Canucks trip raffle

There is also the raffle for a trip to see the Vancouver Canucks play the Colorado Avalanche at Roger’s Arena, Feb. 21, 2016. The prize includes VIP tickets to the game, as well as deluxe accommodation at a downtown Vancouver hotel.

Tickets are going fast at $25 each and the best part is there are only 300 tickets printed. Tickets for the hockey raffle will be available at the Telethon, if there are any remaining. To avoid disappointment, go to the CDA office on Third Street and Cliffe Avenue to buy your ticket on that draw today.

Entertainment schedule

 

 

Noon-1 p.m.

Legion Color Party

Military Wives Choir

Kumugwe Dancers

Barrie Donaldson

Tammy Faessart

Georgia Strait Jazz

 

 

1-2 p.m.

True Colours

CDA Jumpstart Choir

Bruce & Judy

Comox Valley Children’s Choir

Erik Eriksson

 

 

2-3  p.m.

Fiddle Jam

Helen Austin

Triple Heat Dance

Just in Time Choir

Gord Carter

 

 

3-4 p.m.

Guides/Brownies and Pathfinders

Anela Kahiamoe

Dolyna Ukrainian Dancers

Story Circus

Ryan Castle

 

 

 

 

4-5 p.m.

Pantuso Dancers

Pat’s Pack

Jim Papp and Mike Johnson

Keisja Cox

Peter Bourne

 

 

5-6 p.m.

Valley Dance

Doug Cox

Interceptions

Paul Rodgers

Brodie Dawson

 

 

6-7 p.m.

Laurie Tinkler

Luc Guthrie

Darrell & Saskia

Mary Murphy and Paul Kiem

 

 

7-8 p.m.

Sue Medley & John Mang

Des Larson

Finale – Doing it For the Kids!

 

Just Posted

The plan for a three-storey, multi-family building on Second Street hit a setback on a recent provincial grant application. Record file photo
Province turns down grant for Cumberland project

Groups spearheading project may look to federal grant, say village staff

A young bear found deceased at the side of the road in the Comox Valley has conservation officers looking for answers around its death. Black Press file photo
Conservation seeking information for deceased Comox Valley bear

A young bear was found deceased at the side of the road near Kitty Coleman Park

Tools of the trade at the 2019 Vancouver Island MusicFest. Photo by Terry Farrell
Vancouver Island MusicFest goes virtual for 2021

Black Press to stream 25 hours of programming July 9-11

A look at the first stage of the treatment process - where binding of solids and particles in the raw water happens before the water moves to filtration. Photo, CVRD
Water to flow soon from new Comox Valley treatment plant

“We are at our last major hurdle before achieving this critical goal.”

Comox town hall. Black Press file photo
Comox looking at the future of transportation in the town

Council adopted the 2020 Transportation Master Plan Update

People line up to get their COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination centre, Thursday, June 10, 2021 in Montreal. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz
Vaccines, low COVID case counts increase Father’s Day hope, but risk is still there

Expert says people will have to do their own risk calculus before popping in on Papa

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

The Co-op gas station at Whiskey Creek is burning after a camper van exploded while refueling just before 4 p.m. on Thursday, June 17, 2021. (FACEBOOK PHOTO)
Exploding camper van torches Highway 4 gas station between Qualicum Beach and Port Alberni

Highway traffic blocked after Whiskey Creek gas station erupts into flames

Greater father involvement in the home leads to improved childhood development and increased marital satisfaction, says expert. (Black Press Media file photo)
Vancouver Island researcher finds lack of father involvement a drag on gender equality

Working women still taking on most child and household duties in Canada: UVic professor

FILE – A science class at L.A. Matheson Secondary in Surrey, B.C. on March 12, 2021. (Lauren Collins/Surrey Now Leader)
Teachers’ union wants more COVID transmission data as B.C. prepares for back-to-school

BCTF says that details will be important as province works on plan for September

Provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry outlines B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan, May 25, 2021, including larger gatherings and a possible easing of mandatory masks on July 1. (B.C. government photo)
B.C. records 120 new COVID-19 cases, second vaccines accelerating

Lower Pfizer deliveries for early July, Moderna shipments up

A Heffley Creek peacock caught not one - but two - lifts on a logging truck this month. (Photo submitted)
Heffley Creek-area peacock hops logging trucks in search of love

Peacock hitched two lifts in the past month

The Calgary skyline is seen on Friday, Sept. 15, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
2 deaths from COVID-19 Delta variant in Alberta, 1 patient was fully immunized

Kerry Williamson with Alberta Health Services says the patients likely acquired the virus in the hospital

The first suspension bridge is the tallest in Canada, with a second suspension bridge just below it. The two are connected by a trail that’s just over 1 km. (Claire Palmer photo)
PHOTOS: The highest suspension bridges in Canada just opened in B.C.

The Skybridge in Golden allows visitors to take in views standing at 130 and 80 metres

Most Read